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Originally published July 22, 2013 at 9:32 PM | Page modified July 23, 2013 at 4:45 PM

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Mariners manager Eric Wedge sent to hospital after dizzy spells

‘Everything seems to be normal’ with Wedge after experiencing difficulty during batting practice, GM Jack Zduriencik said. Wedge was sent to the hospital for precautionary reasons.

Seattle Times staff reporter

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Mariners manager Eric Wedge was taken to a hospital for precautionary reasons Monday after being overcome by dizzy spells during batting practice.

Wedge, 44, was said to be talkative and feeling better in the clubhouse, but the team chose to send him to the hospital. Mariners bench coach Robby Thompson managed the team Monday night in Wedge’s absence.

Mariners general manager Jack Zduriencik helped several players assist Wedge in getting down the dugout steps to leave the field.

“He’s fine; he’s being evaluated by our doctors,” Zduriencik said. “Everything is good, looks real good. What we’re doing is we’re going to be very cautious about this and he’s going to get checked tonight. We’ll run him up to the hospital just to make sure we cover all of our bases. But he’s talking well, he’s fine and everything seems to be normal.”

Mariners physician Mitch Storey was on hand at the park when Wedge first began experiencing difficulty. He was later joined inside the clubhouse by team medical director Dr. Edward Khalfayan, who helped Storey examine Wedge.

Moments before suffering the dizzy spells, Wedge had gathered with the media for his daily briefing, which lasted roughly the usual five minutes.

“It’s always good to get back home,’’ Wedge said. “Beautiful weather, back in front of our fans. We’re coming home, we’re going to play a good baseball team, so yeah, after the (all-star) break, it’s always exciting to be back here.’’

Miller named AL Player of the Week

Mariners shortstop Brad Miller grew up about “two minutes” from Ken Griffey Jr.’s house in Orlando, Fla. and on Monday added something else in common with the future Hall of Famer.

Miller became the first Mariners rookie since Griffey in 1989 — the year Miller was born — to win AL Player of the Week honors. He earned it by going 5 for 13 (.385) with two homers and seven runs batted in against the Houston Astros in a three-game sweep during an abbreviated week.

“Obviously, he’s my favorite player of all-time,’’ Miller said. “So, that was kind of surreal. Just being mentioned with him and obviously, growing up a Mariners fan and a Junior fan, it was pretty surreal.’’

Miller said the key to his quick start has been an ability to “roll with the punches’’ and maintain an even keel. He said he learned about the weekly honor via social media and some friends back home.

“I had a couple of buddies text me and I said ‘Really?’,’’ he said. “So, I had to check it out, and then I saw it on Twitter that I was, and then my dad called me. So, that was pretty sweet.’’

Note

• Mariners slugger Michael Morse began an injury rehabilitation assignment for his strained quad muscle on Monday with Class AAA Tacoma. Morse served as the night’s designated hitter and was to play five innings of right field on Tuesday as well.

The Mariners haven’t said how long Morse will need with the AAA squad. He went on the 15-day DL a month ago and has appeared only sparingly since late May.

Geoff Baker: 206-464-8286 or gbaker@seattletimes.com.

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