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Originally published Tuesday, April 10, 2012 at 8:40 PM

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Cincinnati signs All-Star Phillips to six-year, $72.5 million deal

The Reds made another significant financial commitment on Tuesday, giving All-Star second baseman Brandon Phillips a six-year, $72.5 million contract. That came...

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CINCINNATI — The Reds made another significant financial commitment on Tuesday, giving All-Star second baseman Brandon Phillips a six-year, $72.5 million contract. That came only five days after former NL MVP Joey Votto got 10 years and $225 million added to his deal.

They're all-in for a run of playoff appearances.

"I think this puts us in a pretty good position to build around two premier players on the everyday side, and with some of the pitchers we have to be a contending club for years to come, hopefully," general manager Walt Jocketty said. "It's not easy. A lot of things have to go right for you.

"But we're getting deeper and deeper in talent. That's what it's going to take in a small market."

Phillips' deal is the last major one for a while. It's been in the works since last year.

The Reds couldn't agree on the length of a new deal with Phillips, so they exercised the 2012 option on his old contract that is worth $12.5 million. They remained at odds until the Reds agreed to a longer deal.

"We originally had a certain number of years in mind that we were going to do the deal," Jocketty said. "Then we realized that we'd probably have to extend another year, and that's what we did. We went another year on the contract. We were able to get the deal done rather quick after that."

The new deal adds salaries of $10 million for next year, $11 million in 2014, $12 million in 2015, $13 million in 2016 and $14 million in 2017.

Notes

• Hall of Fame broadcaster Vin Scully missed the Dodgers' home opener for the first time in 35 years because of a cold. The 84-year-old Scully was advised by doctors to rest.

Scully, who joined the Dodgers in 1950 and is the dean of major-league baseball broadcasters, was preparing to announce the Masters golf tournament in 1977 when he last missed the team's home opener.

• Third baseman David Wright has a broken right pinkie and was removed from the New York Mets' starting lineup against Washington.

X-rays later showed a fracture in the finger, and New York said it will be placed in a splint. The Mets said surgery is not required and doctors cleared Wright to return to baseball activities as soon as he can tolerate them.

Carlos Santana signed a five-year $21 million contract with the Cleveland Indians, who locked up one of their core players through the 2016 season. The deal includes a club option for 2017.

• Fox is objecting to the proposed sale of the Los Angeles Dodgers, saying the incoming ownership group that includes Magic Johnson has not disclosed whether Time Warner Cable is involved in the purchase.

Fox's Prime Ticket subsidiary filed the objection in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware. It asked for written assurance that Time Warner wasn't contributing funds being used for Guggenheim Baseball Management's purchase of the team from Frank McCourt and the incoming owners don't have any formal or informal agreements for the team's broadcast rights starting in 2014.

• Former major-leaguer Vladimir Guerrero said he has surrendered to police after authorities contend he attacked a police officer in a disco in the Dominican Republic. Guerrero denied being part of an attack.

• Oakland Athletics reliever Joey Devine will miss the season after having reconstructive surgery on his right elbow for the second time in three years. The operation was performed in Florida by Dr. James Andrews and is the latest setback for the 28-year-old, already on the disabled list with biceps tendinitis.

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