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Originally published June 23, 2014 at 8:50 PM | Page modified June 24, 2014 at 10:09 AM

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Hope Solo pleads not guilty to assault; documents describe family fight

Soccer superstar Hope Solo was drinking and in a bad mood, her nephew told police, when she called him “fat and unathletic” before her arrest Saturday on two counts of domestic-violence assault.


Seattle Times staff reporter

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Solo would not leave, however, and was "circling like a shark," the teen told police. On behalf of my species, I wish... MORE
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Hope Solo arrived at her half-sister’s home in Kirkland on Friday night in a bad mood and apparently had been drinking, her nephew told police just before the soccer star was arrested on two counts of fourth-degree domestic violence assault.

Solo was upset that her husband — former Seahawks tight end Jerramy Stevens — had refused to take her to the airport to catch a flight “because he was being a jerk,” the 17-year-old nephew told police, according to court documents released Monday.

She continued to drink wine that evening and later, after other relatives had left the family gathering, became angry with her nephew, calling him “fat and unathletic” and then assaulted him and his mother, Solo’s older half-sister, the documents note.

Solo, 32, pleaded not guilty to the gross-misdemeanor charges during her arraignment Monday in Kirkland Municipal Court. She was released from custody on personal recognizance, and ordered to not consume alcohol and to stay away from the alleged victims as conditions of her release.

The next court hearing for the Seattle Reign goalkeeper was scheduled for Aug. 11.

Among those in the Kirkland courtroom were Stevens and a spokeswoman for the Reign. Both declined to comment after the hearing.

Solo’s attorney, Todd Maybrown, said in court and in emails that his client was not guilty of assaulting her relatives, indicating Solo was the victim. He said Solo was hit over the head with a broom handle during the melee at the Kirkland home.

Solo was arrested after police responded to a 911 call about a disturbance in the 10600 block of 124th Avenue Northeast. The male caller reported that a woman at the residence was hitting people and that no one could get her to stop or leave the house, according to police.

Officers arrived and immediately heard a disturbance inside. They entered the house and spoke with several people, including Solo, who officers said appeared intoxicated and upset.

Solo’s nephew told police that his mother had just started letting Solo back into their lives, according to an affidavit of probable cause outlining the police case. Solo had been estranged from the family because “she always does this,” the teen reportedly told police, an apparent reference to past problems.

Police wrote in the affidavit that the teen’s T-shirt was torn and he had scratch marks on his arms and a bleeding cut on his ear when officers arrived.

The teen told police the altercation began as he discussed theatrical productions he’d been in, the affidavit says. The teen explained that he believes that a good actor has to have an “athletic state of mind.”

Solo then told him he was “too fat and overweight and crazy to ever be an athlete,” according to the court document.

The teen responded by calling Solo a name, told her to get out of the house and then walked into another part of the house. Solo followed him and called him crazy again, the document says.

He told Solo that she and her father were crazy, according to the affidavit. Solo charged him, punched him in the face and tackled him, the court document alleges.

When the teen’s mother tried to intervene, Solo attacked her as well, the document says. The teen tried to pull Solo off his mother and then broke a wooden broom over her head, the document says.

Court documents say the 17-year-old “got an old gun that did not work” and pointed it at her in an attempt to get her to stop assaulting him and his mother and to leave. The handgun was ultimately determined by police to be a broken BB gun.

Solo would not leave, however, and was “circling like a shark,” the teen told police.

According to the affidavit, Solo’s sibling got her out of the house, but Solo then walked around it, hopped over a fence and re-entered through a sliding door.

Solo reportedly accused her sister of hiding her phone and started hitting her again, the affidavit says.

Solo, long considered one of the best women’s goalkeepers in the world, is a two-time Olympic gold medalist. At the University of Washington, she was a three-time All-American and four-time All-Pac-10 selection.

Reign FC has closed its practices Thursday and Friday leading into Saturday’s home game against Sky Blue FC at Memorial Stadium.

Solo had earned her 71st international shutout for the U.S. women’s national team on June 14, tying Briana Scurry’s federation record.

Solo also has appeared on TV’s “Dancing with the Stars.”

In November 2012, Stevens, who was her boyfriend at the time, was arrested for allegedly assaulting Solo. A stun gun was reportedly used to break up the altercation.

Hours later, Stevens and Solo were married.

Stevens, who played football for the UW, was released because of insufficient evidence in the case. He was never charged.

Seattle Times staff reporter Joshua Mayers contributed to this story, which includes information from Times archives.

Christine Clarridge can be reached at cclarridge@seattletimes.com or 206-464-8983.



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