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Originally published April 24, 2014 at 9:23 PM | Page modified April 25, 2014 at 9:55 AM

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Suspect admits terrorizing boy found in Spokane Valley house

A 12-year-old boy, discovered during a police raid at a Spokane Valley home, reportedly had been hit, made to pick up dog feces with his bare hands and threatened with a chain saw.


The Spokesman-Review

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A 12-year-old boy found Tuesday in a Spokane Valley home raided by police reportedly had been hit, shoved, made to pick up dog feces with his bare hands for hours and threatened with a chain saw.

According to court documents, Robert D. Pearson admitted to police he threatened to cut the boy into pieces and “make him disappear,” causing the boy to curl up in a ball on a couch in terror.

Pearson told police he was trying to “spook” the boy, who had been brought to him by the boy’s father to be disciplined for stealing. Police raided the home at 14323 E. Longfellow Ave. looking for stolen property.

The boy’s father allegedly assaulted him in Idaho and is now being held in the Kootenai County Jail on $10,000 bond facing a charge of cruelty to a child. Police officers saw recent bruises on the boy’s chest and neck, according to court documents.

Pearson was ordered held on $25,000 bond during a brief court appearance Wednesday after being charged with harassment, threats to kill, possession of a controlled substance and trafficking in stolen property.

According to court documents, police believe Pearson and his accomplice, Dennis M. Blessing, routinely bought and sold items stolen in local burglaries.

Blessing was ordered held on a $7,500 bond during his court appearance Wednesday.

Seven other people were detained for questioning after the search warrants were served at 4609 N. Calvin Road and the house on East Longfellow, but they were not arrested, Spokane Valley police spokesman Deputy Mark Gregory said. The investigation is continuing and more arrests are likely, Gregory said.



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