Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published January 23, 2014 at 9:38 PM | Page modified January 24, 2014 at 4:47 PM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (17)
  • Print

Super Bowl on, events called off or rescheduled in Seattle area

Regular plans for Sunday, Feb. 2, are giving way to Super Bowl-watching parties and rescheduling of events.


Seattle Times staff reporter

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
I just hope the Mariners top brass is noticing all the attention the Seahawks have... MORE
Pretty awesome how they live stream for free - definitely something more networks shoul... MORE
Yet, all this could come to naught if a snow storm hits NY that day. How can the NFL... MORE

advertising

In most years, the first Sunday in February would be a great time to get winter-weary Seattle residents thinking about the fun they could have on a new boat once the weather warms up.

This year, not so much.

Recognizing that Puget Sounders may have something else they plan to do that day — specifically, watching a football game from faraway East Rutherford, N.J. — the Seattle Boat Show, opening Friday, has decided to end its run a day early, on Feb. 1.

And they’re not alone.

The Children’s Film Festival Seattle is moving films that were set to be shown on the afternoon of Feb. 2 to the following Saturday, the final day of the event.

In Edmonds, a minister who drew some mixed reaction a year ago when he changed the Sunday worship schedule to accommodate a Seahawks’ game on TV is doing something similar this year, even though the game isn’t until 3:30 p.m.

Other individuals and organizations have modified their plans, some planning Super Bowl-watching parties to replace regular Sunday events

And word is that at least one University of Washington faculty member has postponed an exam so that students don’t need to take it the day after the Super Bowl.

At the Seattle Boat Show, closing a day early was “the toughest decision I’ve been involved in,” said George Harris, president of the Northwest Marine Trade Association.

“We saw this coming and started the conversation back in November,” said Harris, adding that the decision was made by the organization’s 13-member board.

Harris said the group had to weigh its responsibilities both to the 60,000 boaters who attend the event and the 444 participating business.

The event is finding a way to tap into Seahawks fever.

For a two-hour window on most days of the show, attendees will be able to walk out onto CenturyLink Field, and take photos on the venue where the Seahawks just won the NFC Championship.

Those opportunities will be noon to 2 p.m. each day except Wednesday and Thursday, when a private event has the field booked.

The dual-location Seattle Boat Show also has activities on the south end of Lake Union, at 901 Fairview Ave. N., and a free shuttle running between the two locations.

Ending the boat show a day early appears to have public support.

The announcement on the event’s Facebook site has drawn more than 60 “likes.”

Children’s Film Festival Seattle, which features 120 children’s films from more than 35 countries, posted a notice on its website, saying it rescheduled the Feb. 2 showings because, “We know you don’t want to miss the big game or big screen excitement.”

Pastor Barry Crane at North Sound Church in downtown Edmonds drew some opposition a year ago when he changed the church schedule in order to get everyone home in time to see a Seahawks playoff game that aired at 10 a.m.

Reception was largely favorable, despite comments from some who suggested the move appeared to put football before God.

This year, on Super Bowl Sunday, he is cutting the church schedule back from three to two services at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m., with “tailgate meals” following each.

Crane wants to tap into the football spirit and will play a video in which Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson tells of his Christian commitment.

Jack Broom: jbroom@seattletimes.com or 206-464-2222



News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

Love the column? Pre-order the book!

Love the column? Pre-order the book!

Reserve your copy of "The Seattle Sketcher," the long-awaited book by staff artist Gabriel Campanario, for the special price of just $29.95.

Advertising

Partner Video

Advertising


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►