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Originally published January 14, 2014 at 9:31 PM | Page modified January 15, 2014 at 10:55 AM

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Sex offender who fled Canada pleads guilty, sentenced to 364 days

Fugitive sex offender Michael Sean Stanley pleaded guilty to misdemeanor charges of harassment and resisting arrest in Seattle Municipal Court.


Seattle Times staff reporter

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Did you read this guys rap sheet? And the judge suspended 154 days???? He raped an... MORE
The light sentence seems out of place when you consider his past handy work..??? MORE
Hopefully they'll file the new charges before he gets out. MORE

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A fugitive sex offender who was arrested in Seattle just weeks after fleeing Canada pleaded guilty Tuesday to misdemeanor charges of harassment and resisting arrest in Seattle Municipal Court.

Michael Sean Stanley was then sentenced to 364 days in jail, and Judge Willie Gregory suspended 154 days of the term. Stanley also received credit for the time he has spent behind bars since his arrest in October, and will be eligible for release on March 10.

Stanley, through his lawyer, asked for alcohol treatment as part of his sentence.

“I got to be responsible for an action,” Stanley told Gregory before he was sentenced. “I do need to do something about treatment. Once I get the treatment I think everything is going to work out.”

Stanley, 48, a U.S. citizen, has an extensive history of sexual assaults and other crimes in Canada. On Oct. 1, while he was under supervision after his release from prison after serving 32 months for kidnapping two boys from a school playground, Stanley cut off an electronic monitoring bracelet in Edmonton, Alberta, and fled to Seattle.

He was arrested in Seattle after police responded to a report of a man yelling in a West Seattle alley early in the morning of Oct. 22. A neighbor told officers that Stanley threatened him after he asked Stanley to quiet down, according to a police report.

Officers said Stanley was belligerent and “actively resisted” their commands, according to a police report. After his arrest, officers confiscated a small lock-blade knife, a flashlight, a screwdriver and pliers from Stanley, according to the report.

After Stanley’s arrest, police said he also had been involved in the sexual assault of a 16-year-old boy that same morning. However, charges have not been filed in the alleged assault.

The King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office said the case is still under investigation.

“Our work on the case continues, including waiting for forensic test results,” Dan Donohoe, spokesman for Prosecutor Dan Satterberg, said in a statement.

Police say Stanley met the teen at a Safeway store, struck up a conversation with him and then lured the boy into an alley. Stanley allegedly gave the teen alcohol before grabbing and sexually assaulting him, police said.

The boy told police he escaped after pulling a knife.

In Canada, Stanley has targeted adults and children, according to Canadian parole documents obtained by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. (CBC).

In 1987, he raped an 82-year-old woman who used a wheelchair after breaking into her apartment. The same night, he was discovered in another apartment with two young girls, including a 15-month-old child who had been undressed, the CBC reported.

In 2000, Stanley was charged with exposing himself to some children, the CBC reported.

He also was charged with sexually assaulting a young girl in 2004, but according to the CBC the girl delayed reporting the incident and eventually refused to testify because she was afraid of Stanley.

He went to prison again in 2006 after luring two mentally impaired boys, ages 9 and 13, to an Edmonton apartment, where he held them and blew crack smoke in their faces. Parole documents indicate he initially had been charged with sexual abuse in that case.

Stanley was on home release in Edmonton after serving a 32-month sentence in that case when he cut off his electronic monitoring bracelet and fled Canada.

Stanley entered the U.S. legally at the Blaine border crossing Oct. 7.

U.S. Customs officials have said they could not arrest Stanley on the Canadian warrant, which could not be served in the United States.

After Stanley crossed the border, Canada said that it would not seek Stanley’s extradition for cutting off his GPS monitor and fleeing the country.

After Seattle law enforcement learned Stanley had moved to the city, he was ordered to register with the King County Sheriff’s Office as a sex offender. He did so just days before his arrest in Seattle.

Information from Seattle Times archives is included in this report.

Jennifer Sullivan: 206-464-8294 or jensullivan@seattletimes.com. On Twitter @SeattleSullivan



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