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Originally published January 9, 2014 at 9:39 PM | Page modified January 10, 2014 at 10:11 AM

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Psychics don’t see eye-to-eye on Seahawks playoff game

Will the Seahawks or Saints win Saturday’s playoff game? Psychics disagree.


Seattle Times staff reporter

Kings of their castle illustrated cover

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You’d think psychic predictions about the same event would be kinda similar, no matter what city they originate from.

I mean, presumably psychic energy is psychic energy.

But guess what?

When psychics — well, not just psychics, but also a warlock, tea-leaves reader, tarot-cards reader, a “psychic barber” and even a mechanized Elvis fortunetelling machine — were contacted in both Seattle and New Orleans, something astounding happened.

Completely different predictions about Saturday’s massively hyped Seattle Seahawks versus New Orleans Saints game!

Yes, it was as if ... as if they all were psychically rooting for their home teams!

Here’s what they had to say.

Cari Roy, New Orleans

Roy says she’s “New Orleans’ most accurate” psychic reader and medium. She’s been a psychic for more than 20 years and, at age 7, says Roy, she could see people “who were on the other side.” That would be dead people.

But, says Roy, since her mother was a medium herself, “She understood what I was talking about.”

She says New Orleans is a wonderful place for psychics: “We have cemeteries right in the middle of neighborhoods. Other places put them out in the suburbs.”

Professional success: A decade ago, says Roy, “I was having visions of a lot of young people coming to New Orleans, and they weren’t drunk. I saw a lot of new buildings happening and new industries.”

It turned out, she says, it was the current high-tech boom in that city.

Rate: $100 for 30 minutes.

The game: “I think New Orleans will end up beating you pretty bad. I’m getting a score of 27 to 14.”

Dawn Taylor, New Orleans

Taylor has studied “under shamans and medicine women” and is an expert angel card reader.

She says she’s been a psychic reader for 40 years. At age 12, says Taylor, “I was seeing other people’s guardian angels and knowing things before they happened, like who was going to go through the yard, or who was going to call.”

Professional success: Taylor also works at a psychic shop and did a card reading for a new employee. “I told her she was going to get what she wanted. Two days later, unexpected, her partner proposed to her.”

Rate: $30 for a 15- to 20-minute reading.

The game: Having lived in Seattle, with kids and grandkids here, Taylor is conflicted. But, “The cards keep saying the Saints are going to win, saying the Seahawks might win. I’m getting that the Saints might win. It might be wishful thinking.”

Sheila Lyon and “The Rock Star,” Seattle

Lyon, “one of America’s foremost psychic entertainers,” and her husband, Darryl Beckman, own the Market Magic & Novelty Shop in the lower level of the Pike Place Market.

Lyon is 67, and growing up in Lake Stevens — “all loggers and farmers” — she says she didn’t fit in. “I had the power of knowledge, and it appeared that I had psychic power,” she says. In high school, she read palms and used tarot cards to tell the fortunes of classmates.

“The Rock Star,” the Elvis-impersonating, coin-operated fortunetelling machine has sat in the couple’s shop for a decade or so. A friend of theirs in Las Vegas had it built.

You pop in three quarters, an Elvis-sounding recording sings out a fortune. Then it pops out a fortune card.

Professional success: In July 2013, a young couple came in and used the Elvis machine. It popped out a card that said, “Will you marry me?”

Says Lyon, “He proposed to her right there.”

Rate: Lyon does events only, charging $250 and up. The machine charges 75 cents, although the fortune cards urge, “Play again and I’ll tell you more.”

The game: Citing Chinese numerology, Lyon predicts the Seahawks will win by at least eight points. The Elvis-like voice sings, “I see lots of love action for you baby, uhhh!” The fortune card includes the message, “Right now is a very good time to move forward.” Sounds like a Hawks win.

Otis Biggs, New Orleans

Biggs is 75 and has been a card and palm reader at the Bottom of the Cup Tea Room since 1972. Raised in a small Louisiana town, his parents Southern Baptists, he felt outcast in the family because of his interest in tarot cards.

“They thought it was evil,” he says.

Biggs says he left home right after high school and never returned. He went to beauty school, worked as a hairdresser and eventually a fortune teller.

Professional success: “I predicted the Saints to go all the way back three or four years ago (it was the 2009-10 season). But I read so many people, I don’t remember what they say. Time is timeless.”

Rate: $35 for 10 minutes, $55 for 30 minutes.

The game: “The tarot cards say it’s going to be a nail-biter, nip-and-tuck. For a while one gets ahead, then the other. I think the Saints may well win by maybe 10.”

Rick Cook, Seattle

OK, so Cook is known as the West Seattle “psychic barber,” but he really isn’t psychic.

What happened is in a previous location a few blocks away from his current place on California Avenue Southwest, there was a psychic shop next door.

That shop had a big white-neon sign that said “PSYCHIC.”

Cook liked it and commissioned a sign that said “BARBER” from the same company.

When the psychic went out of business, the landlord asked Cook if he wanted the “PSYCHIC” neon sign.

“Most new people that come in, we get into a discussion and five or 10 minutes in, they ask about the sign,” says Cook.

No, he doesn’t make predictions, he tells them.

“I tell them, I retired from that business. I could not see a future in it,” says Cook.

Professional success: “One evening I had a guy come in who was in a different universe. He talked about when he was in the CIA and in Guatemala, and how our government uses psychics for interrogation. It got a little scary for a while.”

Rates: $17 for a haircut.

The game: “I think maybe 24-17, Seahawks. They’re going to have to be careful.”

Christian Day, New Orleans

Day is a warlock, a male witch, and has been in the psychic business for 25 years. he owns the Hex Old World Witchery. He was 20 when he learned how to read tarot cards from Laurie Cabot, who in Massachusetts carries the title of the “Official Witch of Salem.”

Professional success: Back in March 2011, when Charlie Sheen went ballistic on worldwide media, calling himself a “Vatican assassin warlock,” actual warlocks like Day took offense.

“We did a spell so he could get his act together,” says Day.

Although Day never heard from Sheen, soon afterward he started to act considerably more normal.

Rates: $35 for 15 minutes.

The game: “You may not like what I’m going to say. I’m going to do this projection that the Saints are going to win.”

But, he says, fans on either team can cast a spell. He says they can buy one of those humongous cylindrical candles and carve the name on it of everybody on the team.

Then, along with incense, they light the candle and the light and aroma “will project that team to win.”

Zoe Niclaus, Seattle

Niclaus has been a medium and “transformational healer” for 14 years. She realized at age 9 she had special abilities.

Friends would place an object under one of nine coffee cups. Niclaus says she always picked the right cup because it emitted special warmth to her.

Professional success: A friend was very late in arriving. Niclaus lay down to relax and closed her eyes.

She immediately saw police-car lights and an ambulance. Although not hurt, her friend had been in a car accident.

Rates: $25 for 15 minutes.

The game: Niclaus swung a “modality” pendulum with quartz crystals to see what it’d tell her.

“I’m gonna say, Seahawks, 31 to 21.”

So there you have them.

Sure, use any of these predictions to place a bet.

Vegas is waiting.

Erik Lacitis: 206-464-2237 or elacitis@seattletimes.com Twitter @ErikLacitis



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