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Originally published Wednesday, January 1, 2014 at 6:56 PM

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FBI gets tips about late Alaska serial killer


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PORT ANGELES — The FBI has received about 100 phone calls since asking the public for information about late Alaska serial killer Israel Keyes.

But FBI special agent Jolene Goeden of Anchorage said this week that none of those calls has connected Keyes to missing people on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state, where he lived from 2001 to 2007.

“The majority of phone calls were from people who knew him and interacted with him, who would give information about the types of things he did, activity he was involved in,” Goeden told the Peninsula Daily News.

Keyes was believed to have killed 11 people across the country between 2001 and 2012, including five while he lived in Neah Bay in northwest Washington, the newspaper reported.

Keyes killed himself in an Anchorage jail in 2012 while awaiting a federal trial in the rape and strangulation murder of his last known victim, Samantha Koenig, 18. The teenager was abducted in February 2012 from the Anchorage coffee shop where she worked. Koenig’s dismembered body was pulled from a lake north of Anchorage two months after she disappeared.

Goeden said FBI agents also are investigating tips they received on missing people elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest.

“They are cases we’re not able to rule him out of, but we can’t rule him into, either,” Goeden said.

Keyes told investigators he killed his victims in fewer than 10 states but did not disclose all the locations or the victims’ identities.

None of Keyes’ victims appears to have lived in Washington state’s Clallam or Jefferson counties, Clallam County Undersheriff Ron Peregrin and Jefferson County Sheriff’s Detective Brett Anglin said Tuesday.

Goeden said two agents in the FBI’s Seattle office have been assigned to the case to investigate any leads in the state.

“The FBI does not typically release investigative details, like tips or leads,” Ayn Sandalo Dietrich, a spokeswoman for the agency’s Seattle office, said Tuesday in an email.

Makah tribal members told the newspaper in August that Keyes was a model citizen in Neah Bay. He worked for the tribe, doing landscaping and putting out plants and flowers in the town.

When Keyes left Neah Bay, he moved to Alaska, a location from which he traveled extensively.

Anyone with information about Keyes or his possible victims should call 800-225-5324, or 800-CALL-FBI.



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