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Originally published May 29, 2013 at 3:05 PM | Page modified May 29, 2013 at 3:06 PM

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Most interesting man backs nonprofit group in Vt.

An actor known in beer commercials as the most interesting man in the world is throwing his fame behind a nonprofit group that's working with survivors of land mines and bombs from war zones across the world.

The Associated Press

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MANCHESTER, Vt. —

An actor known in beer commercials as the most interesting man in the world is throwing his fame behind a nonprofit group that's working with survivors of land mines and bombs from war zones across the world.

Jonathan Goldsmith, who closes his Dos Equis commercials with "stay thirsty, my friend," says he first became aware of the work done by Clear Path International when he moved to Vermont almost three years ago and met its co-founder James Hathaway.

"The wars may have been over for many years, but those land mines are still there waiting to ruin some kid's life or some poor farmer's life," Goldsmith said Wednesday from his Manchester home. "The thousands and thousands of people that they (the Clear Path members) must have saved is astronomical to me. Those land mines are vile, they're vicious and they're still there, lots of them."

Besides his current role in the Dos Equis commercials, Goldsmith has appeared in movies and television shows including "Charlie's Angels," "T.J. Hooker," "Magnum, P.I.," and "Dallas." He said that he has been involved in a number of nonprofit groups and has worked with disabled and at-risk children.

Clear Path, founded in 2000, is based in Bainbridge Island, Wash., and has an office in Manchester, where Hathaway works. The organization operates across the world, including in Afghanistan, Cambodia, Laos, Tajikstan and Vietnam and along the border between Thailand and Myanmar.

Goldsmith said he moved to Vermont to be near where his father used to vacation in New York and fly-fish.

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