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Originally published Thursday, May 23, 2013 at 3:12 PM

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WSU squares off against golf course opponents

A lawyer representing residents near Washington State University says the state failed to consider whether the school should have relinquished a water right it uses to irrigate a golf course.

Associated Press

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A lawyer representing residents near Washington State University says the state failed to consider whether the school should have relinquished a water right it uses to irrigate a golf course.

Instead, Rachael Osborn says, the state allowed the school to alter its water right to municipal use, which is not subject to relinquishment.

Opponents of the golf course contend WSU is mining a declining aquifer that provides water to the region for an amenity, not a need. WSU officials say their use of water is lawful.

The two sides squared off Thursday before the state Supreme Court in Olympia.

Sarah Mack, an attorney for WSU, argued that the university's water right was always claimed for municipal use, even if it wasn't labeled that way.

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