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Originally published Sunday, April 28, 2013 at 6:36 PM

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Wash. lawmakers adjourn, face special session

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is calling a special session in Olympia so that lawmakers can complete their work on a new two-year budget.

Associated Press

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OLYMPIA, Wash. —

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is calling a special session in Olympia so that lawmakers can complete their work on a new two-year budget.

After a 105-day regular legislative session, the Legislature adjourned Sunday evening without coming to an agreement on a new budget. Inslee immediately called them to return on May 13.

Lawmakers are tasked with patching a projected budget deficit of more than $1.2 billion for the next two-year budget, not counting additional money needed for a court-ordered requirement that they increase funding to basic education. The Senate has proposed to balance spending without taxes while the House is seeking roughly $1 billion in new revenue.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

Washington lawmakers adjourned their 105-day legislative session Sunday without coming to an agreement on a new two-year budget. They will have to return for a special session.

Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, was expected to announce a possible time frame for the special session later Sunday. A special session can last up to 30 days.

"We'd like to do this as quickly as possible," Inslee said during an interview with public affairs network TVW earlier in the day.

Senate Republican Leader Mark Schoesler of Ritzville said he wanted lawmakers to be called back immediately to keep the pressure on to find agreement.

"I think people function better with deadlines," he said.

Lawmakers are tasked with patching a projected budget deficit of more than $1.2 billion for the next two-year budget, not counting additional money needed for a court-ordered requirement that they increase funding to basic education.

The House and Senate have taken different approaches to balance state spending and increase funding for education, with the biggest difference centered around whether to raise revenue from extending taxes or eliminating tax breaks.

Democrats have a 55-43 majority in the House. The Senate is controlled by a coalition of 23 Republicans and two Democrats.

Negotiations have continued throughout the week, but Senate Republican budget writer Andy Hill told TVW Sunday that the current situation is one where "the budgets are very far apart" and that the votes do not exist in the Senate to raise taxes.

Senate Minority Leader Ed Murray of Seattle said that he's been frustrated by the majority's seeming resistance to negotiate on the topic of increasing revenue.

"There has to be some willingness to compromise," Murray said.

House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, D-Covington, said that he believed lawmakers would be able to finish their work within one special session, but said he knows it will be a tough negotiation.

"I said from Day 1 said that I thought this was going to be one of the toughest budgets we'd have to put together," said House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, D-Covington. "We'll have to come together. It's somewhere in the middle, we all know that, it's just a matter of getting there."

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Online:

Washington state Legislature: http://www.leg.wa.gov

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