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Originally published Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 11:22 PM

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New wildfires threaten homes in tinder-dry Wash.

New wildfires burning on both the east and west sides of Washington are threatening homes and prompting officials to plead with residents to obey burn bans and be cautious in tinder-dry conditions.

The Associated Press

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OMAK, Wash. —

New wildfires burning on both the east and west sides of Washington are threatening homes and prompting officials to plead with residents to obey burn bans and be cautious in tinder-dry conditions.

A new wildfire that started Thursday northeast of Shelton in Western Washington threatened 100 structures, including at least a dozen homes, and grew to 150 acres by late Thursday, fire spokeswoman Sarah Foster said.

More than 100 firefighters from Mason, Thurston and Grays Harbor counties planned to work through the night protecting homes and battling the flames, she said. The Power Line No. 2 fire was just 10 percent contained. Winds calmed and temperatures dropped Thursday night.

A state mobilization order will allow additional fire crews from across the state to be tapped Friday.

In north-central Washington, a wildfire that started Tuesday on the Colville Indian Reservation has burned across more than 15 square miles and threatens more than 50 homes.

"We have not seen wildfire conditions this bad in October in a lifetime," state Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark said in a statement that extended a statewide ban on outdoor burning through Oct. 15.

"I'm concerned that the shorter days and colder weather will lull some people into thinking it's safe to build campfires or bonfires," Goldmark said. "We need everyone to be cautious, alert and aware of the burn restrictions."

The fire east of Omak had burned across more than 9,600 acres by late Thursday and was 15 percent contained, fire spokesman Mark Grassel said. More than 460 firefighters were on scene there.

Grassel said 54 residences are considered threatened, as well as dozens of outbuildings.

That fire has burned two homes and led to the closure for the week of an Indian boarding school on the reservation.

The National Weather Service has issued a red flag warning for critical fire danger through Friday in most of western Washington and western Oregon.

Forecasters say east winds, combined with low humidity, could cause any fire to rapidly spread out of control. The winds are expected to ease by the weekend.

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