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Originally published November 12, 2011 at 6:59 PM | Page modified November 12, 2011 at 11:01 PM

Occupy Seattle to start composting, recycling

Occupy Seattle organizers have announced that the encampment at Seattle Central Community College will begin charging electronics using human power from retrofitted bicycles, and occupiers will also be composting and reusing plates, cups and silverware instead of disposables.

quotes The chickens have to go. I dont mind the protesters camping out at the snohomish... Read more
quotes Eco friendly homeless encampments, novel idea. Read more
quotes This is just sooooo Seattle. Read more

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Occupy Seattle organizers have announced that the encampment at Seattle Central Community College will begin charging electronics using human power from retrofitted bicycles, and occupiers will also be composting and reusing plates, cups and silverware instead of disposables.

The changes are aimed at making the camp more environmentally friendly. Organizers say the nation's current economic system is "ruthless" to nature.

Organizers say the retrofitted bicycles will be donated and will be used to charge laptops, cellphones and cameras.

Occupy Seattle began its protest more than a month ago at Westlake Park in downtown, eventually moving to the campus of the community college. On Friday, the college said it was exploring legal ways to evict the encampment.

Efforts to evict Occupy protesters at other locations are under way as well.

The Occupy movement in Olympia has drawn the attention of state officials who on Friday called on protesters to voluntarily remove their tents from the monthlong camp at Heritage Park, citing a growing number of police calls there for drugs and violence.

Joyce Turner, director of the state Department of Enterprise Services, personally asked the campers to leave Friday afternoon, Steve Valandra, a spokesman for the department, told The Olympian newspaper. He said Turner made the decision that morning to shut down the camp. There were no confrontations, he said.

"We'll accommodate their free-speech activities," he said. "We just feel like the tents have got to go now."

Valandra said there's no deadline for people to leave, and there's no plan for what to do with the campers if they don't leave.

"We don't want a confrontation," he said.

The camp was still working on an official response to the state's request, Monte Katzenberger said.

Berd Whitlock, an Occupy Olympia participant, said the camp is against aggressive behavior and is asking for the community's support.

Meanwhile, over the weekend, police in Portland were preparing for a possible confrontation with Occupy Portland protesters.

Police were expected to enforce a midnight Saturday deadline for the protesters to leave the city parks.

Police said they believed some people inside the Occupy Portland encampments were preparing for a confrontation when officers attempt to clear the area.

Occupy Portland organizers said the movement is nonviolent and have appealed to people in the camp to resist peacefully when the deadline arrived.

But authorities said that a call for reinforcements had gone out to other cities, and as many as 150 anarchists might come to Portland.

Police also said some elements might be building shields and looking for gas masks.

Portland Mayor Sam Adams has ordered the camp shut down, citing unhealthy conditions and the encampment's attraction of drug users and thieves.

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