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Originally published Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 10:20 PM

Costco, Kemper Freeman and SEIU putting money on initiatives

The latest campaign-finance reports show that Costco, Bellevue developer Kemper Freeman and the Service Employees International Union have each put more than $1 million into initiatives that will likely appear on the November ballot.

Seattle Times staff reporter

quotes Part 2 Those several references in I-1125 to the eighteenth amendment’s... Read more
quotes Part 1 Here is the URL to this new Tim Eyman initiative: http://www.sos.wa.gov/el... Read more

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The latest campaign-finance reports show that Costco, Bellevue developer Kemper Freeman and the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) have each put more than $1 million into initiatives that will likely appear on the November ballot.

State reports show I-1183, which would privatize the state liquor system, has raised $1.86 million in cash and in-kind contributions, largely from Costco. The initiative would close state liquor stores and sell their assets, including the liquor-distribution center. It would allow private stores to sell liquor and create licensing fees for sale and distribution of liquor based on sales revenue.

I-1125, which would make it harder to toll highways, has raised almost $1.3 million with nearly $1.1 million of that coming from Freeman. The measure, sponsored by longtime initiative promoter Tim Eyman, would require that the Legislature, not the state Transportation Commission, set tolls and mandate that a toll on a particular road or bridge be used only for construction, operation or maintenance of that project.

I-1163, aimed at reinstating training requirements for home health-care workers, has raised $1.38 million, all of it coming from SEIU. The measure would require background checks and training for long-term-care workers and providers. It essentially would reinstate a measure approved by voters in 2008 that was delayed by the Legislature because of budget shortfalls.

Sponsors of I-1183 estimate they turned in more than 350,000 signatures to the Secretary of State's office last week; I-1125 turned in a projected 327,000 signatures; and I-1163 backers say they delivered more than 340,000 signatures.

The state requires at least 241,153 valid signatures of registered voters.

Andrew Garber: agarber@seattletimes.com

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