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Originally published July 12, 2011 at 3:15 PM | Page modified July 13, 2011 at 9:34 AM

State pays for music video about picking up dog doo

It may be hard to imagine a music video showing people picking up dog poop in blue plastic bags, all to a rock song. But that's the theme of a new video that just hit the airwaves, encouraging people to clean up after their pets.

Seattle Times staff reporter

Information

Video takes aim at doggy doo: http://mynorthwest.com/?nid=11&sid=512462

quotes Good thing this state has money to burn. Read more
quotes "Video is one of the most powerful tools, since pet waste is a difficult thing to... Read more
quotes Serioulsy?! And we spent HOW MUCH with a special legistlative session to cut spending... Read more

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It may be hard to imagine a music video showing people picking up dog poop in blue plastic bags, all to a rock song.

But that's the theme of a new video that just hit the airwaves, encouraging people to clean up after their pets. Those who are working to clean up Puget Sound hope the new video will make dog owners better caretakers of the environment.

The Puget Sound Starts Here campaign, the work of 60 cities and counties in Puget Sound, have released a music video to encourage dog owners to pick up after their pooches.

"There's over a million dogs in the Puget Sound region and the waste drains into Puget Sound," said Janet Geer, a spokeswoman for Puget Sound Starts Here. "People think it's like organic fertilizer, but it's raw sewage like human waste, and it ends up in local streams and goes into Puget Sound. There's all kinds of nasty things that pose health risks to humans."

While many dog owners are good about picking up waste on walks, they don't always pick it up in their backyards and that ends up in storm drains, Geer said.

Hence the new video. "Video is one of the most powerful tools, since pet waste is a difficult thing to talk about," Geer said. "We put a fun spin on it."

It was produced by Peter Furia, with Seedwell, a digital creative studio in San Francisco. It takes the popular rhythm and blues work "No Diggity," by Blackstreet in 1996, and creates a parody about doggy doo.

"We have strong feelings about keeping the environment clean, and we grew up in the Seattle area," Furia said.

The film is on the Puget Sound Starts Here website and also on www.youtube.com.

The video cost $27,000, paid for by a grant from the Department of Ecology.

Susan Gilmore: 206-464-2054 or sgilmore@seattletimes.com

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