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Originally published Wednesday, March 2, 2011 at 7:17 PM

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Lewis-McChord soldier given hard labor, bad-conduct discharge

Joint Base Lewis-McChord Spc. Corey Moore on Wednesday was sentenced to 60 days' hard labor and a bad-conduct discharge for joining an assault on a fellow soldier, stabbing the corpse of an Afghan combatant and smoking hashish over a period of several months.

Seattle Times staff reporter

Joint Base Lewis-McChord Spc. Corey Moore on Wednesday was sentenced to 60 days' hard labor and a bad-conduct discharge for joining an assault on a fellow soldier, stabbing the corpse of an Afghan combatant and smoking hashish over a period of several months.

Moore was one of 12 Western Washington-based soldiers to be charged as a result of a high-profile investigation of alleged crimes during a yearlong deployment in Afghanistan. Prosecutors charged five of these soldiers with the murder of unarmed Afghan civilians and seven others, including Moore, of lesser crimes.

A 22-year-old from Redondo Beach, Calif., Moore followed his father and grandfather into military service when he joined the 5th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and then deployed to Afghanistan in the summer of 2009.

Moore landed in a troubled platoon based at Forward Operating Base Ramrod. The court found that in December 2009, Moore stabbed the corpse of an enemy combatant in a videotaped crime. For a period of several months, he smoked hashish after returning from missions, and in May 2009 he joined six other soldiers in beating a fellow soldier who blew the whistle on the drug use.

In a statement he read in court, Moore called the stabbing an "outrageous act" and apologized to Pfc. Justin Stoner, the soldier who was subjected to the beating.

Moore was described by Army comrades who took the witness stand as an intelligent and able soldier who — if given another chance — could still make a significant contribution to the military.

In closing arguments, a defense attorney, Capt. Vanessa Mull, said Moore had "incredible potential," and asked the judge, Lt. Col. Kwasi Hawks, to recognize that potential by allowing him to remain in the service.

That request was rejected.

Moore was the fifth of the 12 soldiers to receive a sentence. Spc. Jeremy Morlock, who is charged with three murders, was to face a court-martial on Thursday, but that has been postponed.

Hal Bernton: 206-464-2581

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