Advertising

The Seattle Times Company

NWjobs | NWautos | NWhomes | NWsource | Free Classifieds | seattletimes.com

Local News


Our network sites seattletimes.com | Advanced

Originally published Tuesday, August 17, 2010 at 11:18 AM

Comments (0)     E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

Incumbent WA justices face tough re-election bids

Two state Supreme Court justices fought to retain their seats Tuesday, with the winner of a least one position to be decided in the primary.

Associated Press Writer

OLYMPIA, Wash. —

Two state Supreme Court justices fought to retain their seats Tuesday, with the winner of a least one position to be decided in the primary.

Up for re-election are Chief Justice Barbara Madsen and Justices Richard Sanders and Jim Johnson. Sanders and Johnson are the only ones who face challengers, while Madsen will advance to the November ballot unopposed.

Johnson, who has faced a well-funded attack from liberal groups, is trying to fight off Tacoma attorney Stan Rumbaugh in the only race certain to be decided in the primary.

Johnson's opponents take issue with his ties to the powerful Building Industry Association of Washington, which he represented as a private attorney. Johnson is a former assistant attorney general, but as a private attorney, he drafted one of Tim Eyman's anti-tax initiatives and defended another, fought against tribal claims on private and public lands, and battled to keep Washington's blanket primary-election system alive.

He said he considers himself a constitutionalist, and that his top issues are free speech, religious rights and property rights.

Rumbaugh, who has been an attorney for more than 30 years, has his own practice in Tacoma that deals with personal injury, worker's compensation and wrongful death. He serves on the boards of Bates Technical College, the Tacoma Housing Authority and Planned Parenthood Washington.

Sanders has drawn two opponents, former Court of Appeals Judge Charlie Wiggins and Pierce County Superior Judge Bryan Chushcoff, which means there's a good chance that no one candidate will draw more than 50 percent and win the race in the primary.

Sanders, first elected to the Supreme Court in 1995, is known for his sometimes passionate dissenting opinions, and in past years has drawn fire for controversial actions on and off the bench.

Wiggins is endorsed by many prosecuting attorneys, the state Democratic Party and the Washington Council of Police & Sheriffs.

Sanders, a self-described libertarian, has the support of the BIAW, the state Republican and Libertarian parties, and business groups.

E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

More Local News

UPDATE - 09:46 AM
Exxon Mobil wins ruling in Alaska oil spill case

NEW - 7:51 AM
Longview man says he was tortured with hot knife

Longview man says he was tortured with hot knife

Longview mill spills bleach into Columbia River

NEW - 8:00 AM
More extensive TSA searches in Sea-Tac Airport rattle some travelers

More Local News headlines...

Comments
No comments have been posted to this article.

advertising


Get home delivery today!

Video

Advertising

Marketplace

Advertising