Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published Thursday, April 17, 2014 at 3:30 AM

  • Share:
             
  • Comments (0)
  • Print

Caring always trumps not wanting ‘to pry’ into adult daughter’s life


Syndicated columnist

advertising

Dear Carolyn

Adapted from a recent online discussion.

DEAR CAROLYN: Our 22-year-old daughter lives with her boyfriend, whom we don’t really like, but are cordial when we get together. A friend of our daughter’s recently contacted me to say she had received a “very frightening” note from our “very depressed” daughter, then later backtracked and said there was nothing to worry about and our daughter would probably reach out to us when the time was right.

Piecing together some other facts, I am fairly certain our daughter had an abortion last month. I suspect the friend reached out because she felt it was “above her pay grade” to help our daughter deal with her depression. Our daughter has been out of touch for three weeks, which is uncharacteristic, texting us only that she’s been really busy.

I’m not sure if I should call and ask if something’s up, or wait for her to bring it up. She has every right to her privacy, but I am concerned this depression could spiral downward. What would you do?

– Worried

DEAR WORRIED: I’d wait till she was ready to tell me, but in the meantime call “just to say hi.” I’d also put myself in her path, ever so gently, to make it easy for her to lean on me -- maybe, trump up something to drop off at her apartment.

Normally I wouldn’t insinuate myself into an adult’s life like that, but depression is an exceptional case. Someone needs to be willing to override -- judiciously -- the normal limits to get a good look.

Re: Worried:

Call. Please call. You don’t need to pry, but depression can make reaching out to people so impossibly hard. Just let her know there is a human being in this world who loves her and wants to talk to her. When you’re depressed, one person’s “didn’t want to pry” can feel very much like “doesn’t even care.”

– Anonymous

DEAR ANONYMOUS: Thanks for this, and also for the nudge to answer more fully:

Anyone in this parent’s position would do well to read up on depression. Depression makes getting out of bed, making a phone call, going out for a run, etc., feel like an insurmountable obstacle.

Depression also lies. Depression will say, “No one will care if I stop calling,” when in fact people care a lot. Knowing about depression will help loved ones not take personally the resistance s/he gets from the depressed person. It’s important to know when it’s the illness talking.

It is a nasty, debilitating condition. The National Alliance on Mental Illness (http://nami.org) has good information, as does the National Institute of Mental Health ( www.nimh.nih.gov/index.shtml).

Re: Worried:

I could have been that daughter. I kept it from my parents because I thought they would judge me and I was terrified of tainting their image of me. I’m 90 percent positive, though, that if they had told me specifically that they would love me no matter what was going on (and they knew SOMETHING was going on), then I would have opened up and started healing much sooner than I did.

– Anonymous 2

DEAR ANONYMOUS 2: Very useful, thanks. It’s also good to say this to loved ones when things are chugging along as usual. That lays a foundation for when it’s time to step in.

Email Carolyn at tellme@washpost.com and follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/carolyn.hax. Find her columns daily at www.seattletimes.com/living



Free 4-week trial, then $99 a year for unlimited seattletimes.com access. Try it now!

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

The Seattle Times wins top award for multimedia storytelling

The Seattle Times wins top award for multimedia storytelling

Our Sea Change series received a prestigious 2015 DuPont-Columbia award for showcasing the power of storytelling on the Web. Experience the report here.

Advertising

Partner Video

Advertising

Homes -- New Home Showcase

Condo community has resort-like atmosphere

Condo community has resort-like atmosphere


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►