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Originally published Tuesday, September 10, 2013 at 5:04 AM

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Boyfriend still ‘bestest buddies’ with his ex

Expecting your partner to give up his or her priorities in order to adopt yours makes for an unfair relationship.

Syndicated columnist

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Better to know your "enemy" than not. What do they talk about, when they talk... MORE
This girlfriend sounds like an insecure nightmare who is a control freak, and is upset... MORE
Carolyn's, 'broken record, stay or go advice', is no advice. Women may not know... MORE

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Dear Carolyn

Adapted from a recent online discussion.

DEAR CAROLYN: I have been dating “John” for the past year. He has been divorced for two years from “Heidi,” his wife/partner of 30 years. They had no children and she lives a few states away, but they are “bestest buddies” and were in contact almost daily until I put my foot down.

Many of her calls came in when we were together: in bed, having dinner out, etc. I told John how I saw Heidi’s contact as interference in our relationship. John finally told Heidi not to contact him unless it was divorce-related.

I recently found out they are still in contact. I told him today if he wants a friendship with his ex-wife that is fine; however, I don’t want to be a threesome.

Am I overreacting? Why can’t they move on? He says they are just friends and he is so glad she divorced him to give him a second chance at life. I see her as a ball and chain.

– Don’t Want Drama

DEAR DON’T WANT DRAMA: Drama isn’t a bestest-buddy ex-wife. Drama is seeing a bestest-buddy ex-wife as your cue to try to push her out of the scene.

Certainly it’s just good manners for him to let calls go to voice mail — hers or anyone’s — when you two are together, though that’s about courtesy, not “Why can’t they move on.”

Certainly, too, friendships with exes vary, and so John and Heidi can be anything from healthy buddies to a codependent mess.

But this is not up for debate: He has every right to this friendship. You can point out things that bother you, take offense at being lied to, and decide they’re too cozy and break up with him for it, but you can’t tell him whom he can or can’t care about based on the way you think coupled people are supposed to behave.

So, figure out what you are and aren’t comfortable with. Then talk to him about it — not in an “I expect X” way, but in an “I’m trying to figure out what I can live with” way. Ask him why they haven’t moved on.

I’ll get you started with a can’t-live-with item: his yessing you on ending contact and then calling her anyway.

Once you figure out your and his limits, decide whether his fit well with yours. If yes, stay; if no, go. Much more constructive than a “Who’s right?” debate.

Re: Ex-wife:

Your advice wasn’t what I expected.

What exactly is his right to have? A friendship with his ex-wife? For what purpose? They do not have children or assets together. So what are they doing talking to each other every day? Apparently they are communicating as if they are still married!

I think the girlfriend takes precedent over the ex-wife in this relationship and he needs to listen to her concerns. I would not want to have to plan my relationship around their so-called friendship.

– Anonymous

DEAR ANONYMOUS: Of course not. And so you would have every right and reason to break up with him. That is the solution — to know your own priorities and stay or go based on whether his priorities align with yours. The answer is not to impose your priorities on others.

Email Carolyn at tellme@washpost.com and follow her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/carolyn.hax. Find her columns daily at www.seattletimes.com/living

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