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Originally published September 25, 2013 at 7:25 PM | Page modified September 25, 2013 at 9:21 PM

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Police say half-naked man was high during boat ramming

A 22-year-old Texas man is accused of causing about a half million in damages last week when he allegedly stole a yacht and rammed into vessels and docks in an attempt to flee an “Asian female ninja.”

Seattle Times staff reporter

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Michael Allan Bray was high, half-naked and ranting about an “Asian female ninja” from a Steven Seagal movie when he stole a 42-foot yacht and caused nearly a half-million dollars in damage, King County prosecutors allege.

In charging documents filed last week, King County prosecutors say the Texas man admitted to police that he had consumed alcohol, ecstasy, marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms before the Sept. 15 incident in Portage Bay.

Seattle police said Bray broke into a 1987 Bayliner yacht named Par-a-gon that was moored at the Queen City Yacht Club in the 2600 block of Boyer Avenue East, found the vessel’s keys and started it up.

He then rammed into several other boats, boat sheds and docks, causing an estimated $483,000 in damage, prosecutors say.

According to police, a number of people were on their boats that evening and witnessed the rampage.

One witness, David Svendsen, became afraid that the stolen yacht would crash into vessels with liveaboards.

Svendsen said he “feared that the life” of those on the vessels was endangered so he borrowed a shotgun loaded with birdshot from another boat owner, according to charging documents.

Svendsen told police he yelled for Bray to stop and then fired multiple shots through the window of the Par-a-gon, police and prosecutors say.

Bray was struck by birdshot in the face and hands. The stolen yacht came to a stop and then drifted into the edge of a dock, police said.

When police arrived they found a pantless Bray straddling the stern of the stolen yacht and bleeding from his face, according to charging documents. He pointed wildly in different directions and said, “She shot me,” prosecutors say.

Bray told officers he was a CIA operative who was being pursued by an “Asian female ninja” from a Steven Seagal movie who had been trying to kill him all day, charging documents say.

He claimed he had broken into the yacht to get away from the ninja, but she crept aboard and was hiding in the rafters, court documents say.

Bray said that he was trying to knock her off the yacht by ramming into things, court papers say.

“Bray appeared very paranoid and was in hysterics,” according to police investigators. “He was visibly bleeding from his face and hands and continued to rant and thrash about.”

He was taken to Harborview Medical Center for treatment, police said.

According to prosecutors, the $94,000 Par-a-gon was a total loss as was a second boat. Another 16 vessels were damaged and more than $200,000 in damage to the marina docks and boat sheds was reported.

The Par-a-gon’s owner, who is also the vice-commodore of the Queen City Yacht Club, estimated the damages at closer to $750,000, charging documents say.

While Bray does not have an extensive criminal history, prosecutors successfully argued that bail be set at $100,000 because Bray claimed to be visiting from Texas but had no references to check.

He has been charged with first-degree theft, first-degree malicious mischief and reckless endangerment.

His arraignment is set for Wednesday.

Christine Clarridge can be reached at cclarridge@seattletimes.com or 206-464-8983.


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