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Originally published April 12, 2013 at 8:04 PM | Page modified April 13, 2013 at 3:58 PM

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Quotable: Speaking of Marv Harshman

"When I became a coach, I called him before I called anybody and asked for his advice. We met at BurgerMaster right outside of U-Village...

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I loved the pre-game and post-game interviews Harshman would give. He was always so c... MORE
I hope more former plays contact Percy with stories about Marvelous Marv Harshman. ... MORE

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"When I became a coach, I called him before I called anybody and asked for his advice. We met at BurgerMaster right outside of U-Village. With me, he was like a parent that had a son and he's trying not to interfere, but he'd love you to ask. And I didn't mind asking. I thought he would be the easiest to talk to. He would be the most transparent with me. He would be straight up with me. And the most accessible. We sat there for four hours. A bunch of notes later, we left. That was a lot of information. I learned a lot that day."

Lorenzo Romar

" He always wanted me to shoot the hook shot. He was like, 'That could be a great weapon for you,' but I was always shooting the jump shot. We would practice that hook shot all the time. I'd shoot it sometimes, but I was always shooting that jump shot. That fadeaway jump shot."

James Edwards

" The one thing about Marv, I think that everybody knew him, met him, associated with him could see how sincere he was and how much he really cared about you as a person. He just was a genuine, loving person. He just liked people. He obviously loved sports. He was an extremely knowledgeable coach. Not just about basketball. He was a great football player. He ran track. He knew a lot about sports in general. But he always had time for you. When I first started coaching I'd sit in his office and he had things to do. ... Let's talk and draw stuff on the board. Marv loved doing that, and he was also more than willing to take his time to do it."

Brad Jackson

" He didn't really care about what accolades you had, who you were in high school. It was about what are you doing now and how are you as a teammate. That's how I remember coach representing himself in front of the team. He'd call anybody rock or rockhead. That's just how he was. He didn't care who it was."

Detlef Schrempf

" He was a teacher. He was more of a teacher than coach. I really felt like it was an extension of my school, going to practice. I probably liked that class better than my other classes. He was an unbelievable teacher. He really helped me from an individual standpoint, as well as the team."

Paul Fortier

" I think Coach's teams always executed superbly. They never played outside their game. Marv was never a hollerer or a screamer. But his teams were always well-prepared. It was like he was an orchestra director and he just told them what notes to play, and they executed."

George Raveling

" Our first road trip with the team was to the Indiana Classic in Bloomington, Indiana. It was a four-team tournament and they had a banquet on the eve of the tournament and all four coaches spoke. It was remarkable to me to listen to Marv Harshman address an audience like that. His wit and his class and his charm, and how impressed I was watching him work with an audience. It struck me just remarkably so in the context of the other coaches who spoke, which included of course the host coach. That was the first time I had ever come across Bob Knight. I remember thinking after he had spoken, 'This guy is pretty high on himself. He was boorish and kind of like you would expect him to be knowing him all of these years.' The contrast between him and Marv Harshman was so obvious to me. Then there was another coach. Washington played Army in their first game in that tournament. The Army coach spoke, and I remember it being this young guy that nobody knew. The reverence with which he spoke about Marv Harshman. He was so in awe, almost flattered to be on the same program and podium with Marv Harshman because he so respected Marv and what he'd done in the game. And of course that was Mike Krzyzewski."

Bob Rondeau

Huskies play-by-play announcer

" We were in practice one day and he was teaching us a new play. And the first couple of times I couldn't get it. I was running around, running off of picks. Then he stopped practice and said: 'Williams, you're running around like a blind dog in a meat house.' And the whole crew, Detlef, Reggie Rogers and those guys just started laughing. We still talk about that today. That's one of my favorite memories."

Shag Williams

Former Huskies player (1982-86)

" I was a freshman and my brother was a senior. After practice for the last game I told (Harshman) this is going to be the last time I had a chance to play with my brother and I wanted to be able to get in the game with him. Of course, he kind of smiled and shook his head and went on about his business. Didn't say anything. One of the guys I was shooting free throws with kind of laughed at me and mocked me. He said: 'Boy, you're a freshman. You ain't getting in the game.' The next game — the final home game — he put us in together. That really meant something to me for him to do that. Words can't even explain what that meant to me."

Alvin Vaughn

Former Huskies player (1981-84)

Compiled by Percy Allen

" He always wanted me to shoot the hook shot. He was like, 'That could be a great weapon for you,' but I was always shooting the jump shot. We would practice that hook shot all the time. I'd shoot it sometimes, but I was always shooting that jump shot. That fadeaway jump shot."

James Edwards

" The one thing about Marv, I think that everybody knew him, met him, associated with him could see how sincere he was and how much he really cared about you as a person. He just was a genuine, loving person. He just liked people. He obviously loved sports. He was an extremely knowledgeable coach. Not just about basketball. He was a great football player. He ran track. He knew a lot about sports in general. But he always had time for you. When I first started coaching I'd sit in his office and he had things to do. ... Let's talk and draw stuff on the board. Marv loved doing that, and he was also more than willing to take his time to do it."

Brad Jackson

" He didn't really care about what accolades you had, who you were in high school. It was about what are you doing now and how are you as a teammate. That's how I remember coach representing himself in front of the team. He'd call anybody rock or rockhead. That's just how he was. He didn't care who it was."

Detlef Schrempf

" He was a teacher. He was more of a teacher than coach. I really felt like it was an extension of my school, going to practice. I probably liked that class better than my other classes. He was an unbelievable teacher. He really helped me from an individual standpoint, as well as the team."

Paul Fortier

" I think Coach's teams always executed superbly. They never played outside their game. Marv was never a hollerer or a screamer. But his teams were always well-prepared. It was like he was an orchestra director and he just told them what notes to play, and they executed."

George Raveling

Compiled by Percy Allen

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