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Originally published Friday, September 13, 2013 at 8:05 PM

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Hire a pro to get hot water when and where you need it

If your body has circulation issues, it’s best to call a doctor. For your home’s circulation issues, it’s best to call a master plumber.

Scripps Howard News Service

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Q: You’ve written in the past about “hot-water recirculating” systems for home use when people have to wait a long time for their shower water to get hot.

I have used this type of hot-water system with success in the shower, but now I have trouble getting our normal cold water from the kitchen-sink faucet.

Since we do like the faster hot water to the shower, any suggestions on improving the kitchen-sink cold-water issue?

A: Recirculating systems can get hot water to your shower quickly, but need to be installed following local codes and with all necessary permits.

Because most domestic hot-water recirculating pumps use a home’s existing cold-water lines as a return back to the water heater, it’s important that you work with a licensed master plumber on any crossover issues.

A plumber will check if pumps/controls are set and installed properly, if the system is running at the manufacturer’s recommendations, and if any cold-water lines feeding your kitchen sink need to be moved to help improve the system.

Bottom line: If your body has circulation issues, it’s best to call a doctor. For your home’s circulation issues, it’s best to call a master plumber.

Master contractor/plumber Ed Del Grande is known internationally as the author of the book “Ed Del Grande’s House Call,” the host of TV and Internet shows, and a LEED green associate. For more information, visit eddelgrande.com.

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