Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published Friday, May 3, 2013 at 8:04 PM

  • Share:
             
  • Comments (0)
  • Print

Termites can eat you out of house and home

Spring is swarming season for termites and there are five things you should know to prevent an infestation.

The Washington Post

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
No comments have been posted to this article.
Start the conversation >

advertising

Early spring is swarming-termite season, when young adult termites emerge en masse. Jim Fredericks, director of technical services for the National Pest Management Association, said the “swarmers” surface to mate, form their own colonies and feed.

“There will be thousands of termites in a colony,” Fredericks said. “You never know how many are feeding on your house.”

Here are five things to know about termites, including how to prevent an infestation and how to deal with the insects once they’re found.

1. Termites eat nonstop

Subterranean termite colonies, Fredericks said, travel underground in tunnels from the soil to a building and back, and they can destroy entire structures.

The “mud tubes” termites create are about the width of a pencil, he said, and can be visible from the inside or outside of a building.

2. Termites are “silent destroyers”

The signs of a colony are most obvious this time of year, when termites swarm and form new colonies. But the insects can invade your home undetected and feed on wood, flooring and wallpaper for several years.

“Just because you don’t see swarming termites doesn’t mean termites are not there,” Fredericks said.

“They typically don’t swarm until they are mature, after about five years. A young colony may be in your home for a year or two but not swarm.”

3. Termites don’t just invade your basement

Termite colonies could set up shop in any part of your home.

“I have seen native subterranean termites feeding and swarming on second floors,” Fredericks said. “You’ll find them all over. They are usually found in lower levels, but that’s not a rule.”

4. Extermination is not a DIY project

The first mistake a homeowner can make is to try to identify a termite infestation alone.

Call a professional once a year to do an inspection, Fredericks said, because they are trained to find even the most hidden colonies.

Another blunder? Trying to debug your own home.

“If you find termites and try to control them yourself, that is the next big mistake,” Fredericks said. “I don’t recommend it, and most homeowners usually understand this. It takes specialized tools. “

5. Prevention is possible

There is no surefire way to deter termites from your home, but there are things you can do to minimize risk.

Fredericks cautions homeowners to be aware of moisture; leaking rain gutters and water pipes, rotting wood, and improper grating attract termites, which need water to thrive.

Firewood should also be stored away from the home, he said, because it is termite food. And leave space between soil and any wood portions of your home, so it is easier to spot the subterranean termite’s “mud tubes.”

Advertising

Partner Video

Advertising


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►