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Hoping the ‘Lost 74’ will finally be counted

<a href="http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2024652692_warshiptragedyxml.html"><img src="http://seattletimes.com/ABPub/2014/09/28/2024652953.jpg" width="140" style="float: left; margin-top: -5px; margin-right: 10px;"></a>
Glen Rice, pictured at his Edmonds home with his wife Diane, still gets choked up discussing his late nephew Alan Armstrong (shown at left). On the table are pictures of Armstrong, one of 74 U.S. sailors who died in a training mission in the South China Sea in 1969. A national group meeting in Seattle this week hopes to get greater recognition of the sailors.

Ken Lambert / The Seattle Times

Glen Rice, pictured at his Edmonds home with his wife Diane, still gets choked up discussing his late nephew Alan Armstrong (shown at left). On the table are pictures of Armstrong, one of 74 U.S. sailors who died in a training mission in the South China Sea in 1969. A national group meeting in Seattle this week hopes to get greater recognition of the sailors.

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