Advertising

Originally published July 28, 2011 at 5:17 PM | Page modified July 28, 2011 at 8:31 PM

Tylenol makers cut maximum daily dose to limit overdose risk

Johnson & Johnson said Thursday it's reducing the maximum daily dose of its Extra Strength Tylenol pain reliever to lower the risk of accidental overdose from acetaminophen, its active ingredient and the top cause of liver failure.

No comments have been posted to this article.
Start the conversation >

advertising

TRENTON, N.J. — Johnson & Johnson said Thursday it's reducing the maximum daily dose of its Extra Strength Tylenol pain reliever to lower the risk of accidental overdose from acetaminophen, its active ingredient and the top cause of liver failure.

The company's McNeil Consumer Healthcare Division said the change affects Extra Strength Tylenol sold in the United States.

Starting in the fall, labels on Extra Strength Tylenol packages will now list the maximum daily dose as six pills, or 3,000 milligrams, down from eight pills a day, or 4,000 milligrams.

Beginning next year, McNeil will also reduce the maximum daily dose for its Regular Strength Tylenol and other adult pain relievers containing acetaminophen, the most widely used painkiller in the country.

Excessive use of acetaminophen can cause liver damage. In the U.S., it's blamed for about 200 fatal overdoses and sends 56,000 people to the emergency room each year.

Pregnancy-related strokes increase

Strokes have spiked in the U.S. among pregnant women and new mothers, probably because more are obese and suffering from high blood pressure and heart disease, researchers report.

Hospitalizations for pregnancy-related strokes and "ministrokes" jumped from about 4,100 in 1994-95 to about 6,300 in 2006-07, a nearly 54 percent increase, researchers said, extrapolating from figures in a large federal database.

The number of strokes is small, considering that about 4 million babies are born each year in the U.S.

But Dr. Olajide Williams, a neurologist at Columbia University and Harlem Hospital, said, "That is a very, very alarm-raising statistic ... We need to be more aggressive in screening these women for these risk factors."

The study was published Thursday in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

Child brain cancer, cellphones: no link

The first study comparing brain-cancer incidence in children who use cellphones with those who do not has found no difference, suggesting that children's long-feared vulnerability to brain cancer with early cellphone use does not exist.

In a four-country study published this week in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers matched 352 children and adolescents diagnosed with brain cancer with 646 similar youngsters who were healthy, and compared their patterns of cellphone use.

Some 55 percent of the children diagnosed with a brain tumor reported they had been regular users of a mobile phone before diagnosis.

A slightly smaller 51 percent of the healthy children in the comparison group said they talked regularly on a cellphone. After grouping the children according to the intensity of the cellphone use, the researchers found no relationship between how often a child used a cellphone and the likelihood of his or her developing brain cancer.

The study was conducted in Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Switzerland.

Seattle Times news services

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon




Advertising