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Originally published May 17, 2013 at 6:24 PM | Page modified May 18, 2013 at 12:42 AM

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Golfing icon Ken Venturi dies at age 82

Ken Venturi, who overcame dehydration to win the 1964 U.S. Open and spent 35 years in the booth for CBS Sports, died Friday afternoon. He was 82. His son...

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Ken Venturi, who overcame dehydration to win the 1964 U.S. Open and spent 35 years in the booth for CBS Sports, died Friday afternoon. He was 82.

His son, Matt Venturi, said he died in a hospital in Rancho Mirage, Calif. Venturi had been hospitalized the last two months for a spinal infection, pneumonia, and then an intestinal infection that he could no longer fight.

Venturi died 12 days after he was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame.

He couldn't make it to the induction. His sons, Matt and Tim, accepted on his behalf after an emotional tribute by Jim Nantz, who worked alongside Venturi at CBS.

"When dad did receive the election into the Hall of Fame, he had a twinkle in his eye, and that twinkle is there every day," Tim Venturi said that night.

Venturi was all about overcoming the odds.

A prominent amateur who grew up in San Francisco, he captured his only major in the 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional, the last year the final round was 36 holes. In oppressive heat, Venturi showed signs of dehydration and a doctor recommended he stop playing because it could be fatal. Venturi pressed on to the finish, closed with a 70 and was heard to say, "My God, I've won the U.S. Open."

He had a severe stuttering problem as a child, yet went on to become one of the familiar voices in golf broadcasting. He began working for CBS in 1968 and lasted 35 years.

"Doctors told his mother he will never speak," Nantz said at the Hall of Fame induction. "He will never be able to say his own name. That's what drove him to golf, to sit on a range, beating balls, hearing himself in total clarity in his head, 'This is to win the U.S. Open.' And he overcame that with great will and determination, and became the longest-running lead analyst in the history of sports television."

As an amateur, he was the 54-hole leader in the 1956 Masters until closing with an 80, and he was runner-up at Augusta National in 1960 to Arnold Palmer, who birdied the last two holes.

Notes

Keegan Bradley shot a 1-under 69 in a round that started and ended with bogeys, good enough for a three-stroke lead after two rounds in the Byron Nelson Championship in Irving, Texas.

A day after setting the TPC Four Seasons course record with a 60, Bradley went into the weekend at 11-under 129.

Tom Gillis, who shot 63 in the first group of the day off the No. 10 tee, and Sang-Moon Bae were tied for second.

Olympia's Andres Gonzales and Seattle's Jeff Gove missed the cut.

Jessica Korda shot a 7-under 65 to take a one-stroke lead over Hall of Famer Karrie Webb after the second round of the Mobile Bay (Ala.) LPGA Classic.

Korda had her second straight bogey-free round to reach 13 under.

Former Washington State golfer Kim Welch shot a 67 and was tied for 15th at 7 under. Former Husky Paige Mackenzie had a 73 and was tied for 70th.

• Two-time major champion Rory McIlroy is leaving Dublin-based Horizon Sports Management to set up his own management group.

Ian Poulter was eliminated from the World Match Play Championship after losing another round-robin match in Kavarna, Bulgaria.

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