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Originally published Tuesday, October 18, 2011 at 3:00 PM

8 tips for reducing the sodium in your diet

Follow these tips to cut down on the sodium in your diet.

quotes I have been watching my sodium intake for several years and have read a few labels. On ... Read more

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Q. How can I cut down on salt?

A. Nine out of 10 Americans eat too much salt. If your goal is to eat less salt, here are some simple ways to do it.

1. Use fresh or frozen vegetables instead of canned. One-half cup of canned vegetables has about 15 percent of your daily sodium requirements.

2. Consider condiment substitutes. Soy sauce, teriyaki sauce, Worcestershire sauce and other condiments are brimming with sodium. Low-sodium versions are available; you can also try adding sodium-free flavor enhancers like vinegar or citrus juices like lime, pineapple, lemon and orange.

3. Go easy on the canned spaghetti sauce. One half cup of jarred tomato sauce packs in almost 25 percent of your daily dose of sodium.

4. Cook more. Set a goal to cook more at home where you have the most control over the ingredients.

5. Replace bottled with homemade salad dressing. Bottled salad dressings are a hidden source of sodium. Lighter salad dressings exist, but many replace fat and salt with higher amounts of sugar. Instead, make your own salad dressing in minutes.

6. Choose dried beans. Instead of canned varieties, choose dried with virtually no sodium. If you're a canned-bean fan, then you'll be happy to hear that a recent study showed that rinsing and draining canned beans reduced their sodium content by about 40 percent.

7. Use fresh herbs and spices. Resist the urge to reach for the salt shaker or spices like onion salt or garlic salt. Instead, choose fresh herbs and spices to flavor food. They're practically sodium-free and add tons of flavor.

8. Try juicing. A cup of vegetable-juice cocktail packs in almost one-third of your daily recommended amount of sodium. Instead, make your own favorite veggie-juice combinations without worrying about the salt.

Courtesy Toby Amidor on foodnetwork.com

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