Advertising

The Seattle Times Company

NWjobs | NWautos | NWhomes | NWsource | Free Classifieds | seattletimes.com

Food & Wine


Our network sites seattletimes.com | Advanced

Originally published Tuesday, August 24, 2010 at 3:00 PM

Comments (0)     E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

Recipes: Joe's Stone Crab Apple Pie and tips on preventing a soggy pie crust

A reader is looking for the apple pie recipe from Joe's Stone Crab.

McClatchy Newspapers

Q. How about scoring the delicious apple pie recipe from Joe's Stone Crab? I'd love to have it for my daughter's 20th wedding anniversary, as it is a favorite dessert. — Barbara

A. For decades I've thought of Joe's Key lime pie as the one to measure all others against, and now I get to put the restaurant's apple pie on the same list. According to "Eat at Joe"s," (Clarkson Potter, 1993), the recipe originated with owner Jo Ann Bass, whose grandfather founded the legendary Miami Beach, Fla., restaurant.

Joe's has always been generous about sharing recipes, and you can find several others at the restaurant's website,www.joesstonecrab.com

Joe's Stone Crab Apple Pie

Makes 10 to 12 servings

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into pieces and chilled

1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons solid vegetable shortening

1 tablespoon white vinegar

2 tablespoons ice water (or more as needed)

advertising

Filling

8 red apples

Juice of 1/2 lemon

1/2 cup sugar (or more to taste)

3 tablespoons flour

1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon salt

Topping

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons flour

1 stick plus 1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into chunks and chilled

2/3 cup dark brown sugar

1/2 cup pecans, broken up coarsely

1. Pastry: In a food processor or bowl, mix the flour, sugar and salt. Add butter and shortening; pulse or cut with a pastry cutter until crumbly. Combine vinegar and water; add to mixture and pulse or cut in just until dough comes together. Form it into a ball, wrap in plastic and chill at least a half-hour.

2. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out fairly thin into a neat circle. Fit it, without stretching, into a deep, buttered 9 1/2- or 10-inch pie pan. Form a high fluted border. Refrigerate.

3. Filling: Peel, quarter and core the apples. Slice them into a large bowl, tossing with lemon juice to prevent darkening. In a small bowl, stir the sugar, flour, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg and salt. Sprinkle over the apples and toss to coat.

4. Heat the oven to 375 degrees.

5. Topping: Pulse flour and butter in a food processor or cut with a pastry cutter until butter pieces are about the size of a nickel. Mix in brown sugar and pecans. Refrigerate.

6. Baking: Pour apple mixture into crust, mounding it in the center, and place in the oven. (Put a sheet of aluminum foil on the rack below to catch any drips.) Bake 25 minutes.

7. Raise the oven temperature to 400 degrees. Scatter the topping over the apples, covering them completely and pressing gently to adhere. Bake until the topping is nicely browned, 25 to 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack; serve at room temperature or lukewarm.

Per serving: 574 calories (50 percent from fat), 32.3 g fat (15.8 g saturated, 9.4 g monounsaturated), 58.6 mg cholesterol, 5.5 g protein, 68.3 g carbohydrates, 3.2 g fiber, 239 mg sodium.

From Linda Cicero's Cook's Corner

Q: When I make a fruit pie or rhubarb or lemon pie, my bottom crust gets so soggy you can't eat it. We spoon the filling into a dish and eat it that way. What can I do to make a good two-crust pie? I have tried putting extra flour or tapioca in the filling to make it thicker, with no luck. — Barbara

A: The problem is that your bottom crust is not baking enough before liquid from the filling seeps into it. There are several steps you can take to help avoid a soggy crust.

The easiest is to thoroughly chill the crust after you've rolled it out and placed it in the pie pan. Another simple step: Heat your oven to 450 degrees, put your filled pie in on the bottom rack, and bake 10 minutes before moving the pie to the middle rack and reducing the temperature to 350 degrees or whatever your recipe requires.

To be even more sure your crust won't be ruined, consider partially baking the bottom shell before you fill it. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Put the bottom crust in the pan. Line it with foil and add pie weights, dried beans or rice. Bake 10 minutes, then remove from oven and let cool on a rack before filling. Remove the dried beans or rice from the foil and store for a similar use later — do not eat the bean or rice that has been used in blind baking. Continuing with your recipe.

A third method is to glaze the inside of your pie crust before you add the filling. Beat an egg with a teaspoon of water, brush it on the bottom and sides of the bottom crust and let it stand before filling.

E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

More Food & wine

NEW - 10:07 AM
Obese people asked to eat fast food for health study

Seattle Beer News | Brouwer's Hard Liver Barleywine Festival kicks off this Saturday

Organic advocates voice concern for 'natural' food

Taste: Muffuletta sandwiches are the Big Easy's best

NEW - 7:00 PM
Wine Adviser: Some good Washington wineries got away

More Food & wine headlines...

Comments
No comments have been posted to this article.


Get home delivery today!

Video

Advertising

AP Video

Entertainment | Top Video | World | Offbeat Video | Sci-Tech

Marketplace

Advertising