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Originally published Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 3:09 PM

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‘22 Jump Street’: a laugh-out-loud sequel

A three-star movie review of “22 Jump Street,” a fun sequel about two undercover cops (Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill) tracking down a new designer drug that college kids are using.


McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Movie Review ★★★  

‘22 Jump Street,’ with Channing Tatum, Jonah Hill, Ice Cube. Directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, from a screenplay by Michael Bacall, Oren Uziel and Rodney Rothman, based on the TV series “21 Jump Street.” 112 minutes. Rated R for language throughout, sexual content, drug material, brief nudity and some violence. Several theaters.

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You’re pretty much going to have to see “22 Jump Street” twice — just to catch all the jokes the roars of laughter make you miss.

No kidding. When this buddy-cop parody hits its sweet spots — bromance gags carried to hilarious extremes by Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum; too-dumb-to-be-a-cop riffs by Tatum; and a couple of vintage, sneering rants by Ice Cube — “22,” the sequel to “21,” only “exactly the same” as the first film (a running gag), becomes a “see it again on Netflix when I can hear it all” experience.

Undercover cops Jenko (Tatum) and Schmidt (Hill) are sent off to M.C. State University to track down a new designer drug that college kids are using to help them focus.

They try to blend in by doing slam poetry, pledging a frat, attending classes that are out of their dimwitted depth, hitting parties and asking around about the drug and a coed who died because of something she knew about it.

But they’re not fooling anybody.

“He’s like a 30-year-old eighth grader!”

The filmmakers conjure up good, quick-footed and foul-mouthed fun. It goes on way too long, peaks too early and sputters before rallying with a frothy finale and a closing credits gag that kills, but also goes on too long.

That doesn’t much matter. Hill and Tatum are the unlikeliest of big-screen odd couples, a happy-goofy one that seems headed for a long and fruitful relationship.



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