Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published Thursday, April 17, 2014 at 3:05 PM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (0)
  • Print

A funny showcase for Steve Coogan’s misfit ‘Alan Partridge’

A three-star movie review of “Alan Partridge,” a very funny film starring Steve Coogan, who brings the titular character he created for British television years ago to the big screen.


Special to The Seattle Times

Movie Review 3 stars

‘Alan Partridge,’ with Steve Coogan, Colm Meaney, Tim Key, Felicity Montagu. Directed by Declan Lowney, from a screenplay by Coogan, Peter Baynham, Neil Gibbons, Rob Gibbons and Armando Iannucci. 90 minutes. Rated R for language, brief violence and nudity. Varsity.

advertising

British comedian and actor Steve Coogan is probably best known in the U.S. as one half of a pair of competing mimics in “The Trip” and for cowriting, producing and starring alongside Judi Dench in the Oscar-nominated drama “Philomena.”

In England, however, Coogan was a television superstar long before his film career took off. He is especially beloved for playing a character named Alan Partridge, a self-absorbed, socially inappropriate media-broadcast personality, on several series.

Both Ricky Gervais’ yammering, filterless David Brent character on the original British version of “The Office” and Will Ferrell’s outrageous Ron Burgundy in “Anchorman” owe something to Alan Partridge.

Coogan’s very funny new film, “Alan Partridge,” brings the motormouth misfit to the big screen while showcasing the actor’s comic mastery.

The jump isn’t entirely smooth — the movie feels like a succession of sketch ideas — but it’s a good platform for Partridge’s blend of awkward patter, narcissism and utter cravenness.

The great Colm Meaney co-stars as Pat Farrell, a late-night radio host at a station where Partridge is a midmorning DJ. When new management sacks Farrell, he brings a gun to the office and holds everyone hostage.

The crisis puts Partridge and his considerable ego in the spotlight as he secretly helps (and alienates) the police, stages an embarrassing escape through a window and even replicates Al Pacino’s “Attica” scene from “Dog Day Afternoon.”

Good as Coogan typically is in any film, he has never seemed more grounded in a role than as Partridge, an alter ego he wears like a glove.

Tom Keogh: tomwkeogh@yahoo.com



Want unlimited access to seattletimes.com? Subscribe now!

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►
The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription upgrade.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. For unlimited seattletimes.com access, please upgrade your digital subscription.

Call customer service at 1.800.542.0820 for assistance with your upgrade or questions about your subscriber status.

The Seattle Times

To keep reading, you need a subscription.

We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary access. Subscribe now for unlimited access!

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Activate Subscriber Account ►