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Originally published Friday, October 26, 2012 at 8:00 PM

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Bridge-style faucet makes splash in kitchen

Installation is pretty standard.

Scripps Howard News Service

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Ed the Plumber

Q: I’m going to install a new kitchen faucet and sink in the near future. I’m looking at the new bridge-type faucets. When did they come on the scene, how are they installed, and what special considerations do I need to address? To me, it doesn’t look like a normal faucet installation.

— Charles, New Mexico.

A: Today’s bridge-style faucets actually get their look from many decades ago, when kitchen faucets were basically two separate one-handle faucet valves coming out of the wall over the sink.

As these single hot and cold faucets evolved, they eventually were connected by a single pipe with a swinging spout in the middle of the connector pipe. However, all the plumbing was exposed, and this created the bridge faucet, because the connector pipe looked like a bridge between the hot and cold valve handles.

New bridge faucets — a modern takeoff of this original design — can be wall-mounted or deck-mounted right on the sink. But, because they usually require two holes in the kitchen sink instead of the standard three holes, you might have to special-order the sink.

As long as you’re not wall-mounting the faucet, installation is pretty standard. Finally, these faucets are available in many finishes and styles, from ultramodern to old-time classic. So, you might say that a bridge faucet even bridges the generation gap.

Master plumber Ed Del Grande is the author of “Ed Del Grande’s House Call,” the host of TV and Internet shows, and a LEED green associate. Visit eddelgrande.com or write eadelg@cs.com. Always consult local contractors and codes. Sorry, no personal replies.


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