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Originally published March 5, 2014 at 8:28 PM | Page modified March 5, 2014 at 8:41 PM

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10-second rule withdrawn by NCAA rules committee

The NCAA football rules committee tabled a proposal Wednesday that would have penalized offenses for snapping the ball before 10 seconds had run off the 40-second play clock.


The Associated Press

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NEW YORK – Round 1 in the fight over pace of play in college football goes to those who have the need for speed.

The NCAA football rules committee tabled a proposal Wednesday that would have penalized offenses for snapping the ball before 10 seconds had run off the 40-second play clock.

The committee decided not to send the so-called 10-second rule to the playing rules oversight panel for approval Thursday.

“What the committee agreed to do was table that proposal to allow time to gather more information from the medical community and allow time for a broader discussion for the implications of that change,” Rogers Redding, NCAA national coordinator of officials, said.

Redding said the NCAA received 324 comments during the feedback period after the proposal passed and 75 percent opposed the change; 16 percent supported the proposal. The rest were uncertain.

Redding also said a new proposal was passed by the committee to expand roughing the passer to include “forcible” hits to the knees or below. That proposal goes into a comment period before it will be taken up by the oversight panel.

Note

• Former West Virginia player Shawne Alston sued the NCAA and five major conferences, saying they violated antitrust laws by agreeing to cap the value of an athletic scholarship at less than the actual cost of attending school.

Attorneys Steve Berman and Bruce Simon, who have been involved in cases challenging the NCAA’s ability to sell college athletes’ likenesses to video-game makers, filed the proposed class-action lawsuit in federal court in San Francisco.

Alston, a running back for West Virginia from 2009-12, is the only named plaintiff. The lawsuit also seeks to represent all scholarship players who have competed since February 2010 in the Atlantic Coast Conference, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12 and Southeastern Conference. Alston had to take out a $5,500 loan to cover the difference between his scholarship and actual costs of attendance, the suit said.



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