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Originally published July 15, 2013 at 6:54 PM | Page modified July 15, 2013 at 10:51 PM

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P.J. Hairston to face ‘serious consequences,’ North Carolina coach Roy Williams says

North Carolina basketball coach Roy Williams said leading scorer P.J. Hairston will face “serious consequences” after being arrested last month on a drug charge during a traffic stop.

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College basketball

N. Carolina coach says Hairston will face ‘serious consequences’

North Carolina coach Roy Williams said Monday leading scorer P.J. Hairston will face “serious consequences” after being arrested last month on a drug charge during a traffic stop.

In a statement, the Hall of Fame coach said he hasn’t yet determined a punishment for swingman Hairston, 20, who has also been cited twice by police while allegedly driving a rental vehicle linked to a felon.

“P.J. and I have had several discussions already and he knows he has made serious mistakes and there will be serious consequences as a result,” Williams said.

Williams said there are “several options available” as punishment, including a possible suspension. Hairston faces an August court hearing and isn’t enrolled in summer school. The team is in the offseason so Williams says he will wait “until the process is complete” to decide on the punishment.

Hairston was arrested June 5 and charged with misdemeanor marijuana possession in Durham, N.C., while driving a rented 2013 GMC Yukon.

According to rental records, the Yukon was one of two vehicles driven by Hairston and linked to Haydn Patrick “Fats” Thomas, a Durham man facing pending drug charges. Hairston also was cited for speeding in May while driving a 2012 Camaro rented under a woman’s name using Thomas’ home address.

“Our basketball program is based on great ideals, and these issues are embarrassing,” Williams said.

Hockey

KHL team signs Kovalchuk

Forward Ilya Kovalchuk walked away from about $77 million when he retired from the New Jersey Devils and the NHL last week at age 30, citing a desire to return to Russia with his family.

He has signed a four-year dealt with SKA St. Petersburg of the Kontinental Hockey League.

League president Alexander Medvedev told the Russian daily Sport-Express that Kovalchuk’s earnings in four years with SKA will be “absolutely comparable” to what he would have made in four years with the Devils. Taxes are far lower in Russia than they are in New Jersey.

In his 11 NHL seasons, Kovalchuk has 417 goals — more than any player during that span. He played with SKA St. Petersburg during the recent NHL lockout.

Geoffrion, 25, says he is retiring

Montreal Canadiens forward Blake Geoffrion, 25, is retiring because of lingering effects of a skull fracture and concussion suffered during an American Hockey League game in November.

Geoffrion, the grandson of former Canadiens star Bernie “Boom Boom” Geoffrion, has eight goals in 55 career NHL games.

Track and field

IAAF looks on the bright side

The credibility of track and field’s anti-doping program has been “enhanced, not diminished” after sprinters Tyson Gay of the United States and Asafa Powell of Jamaica tested positive for banned substances, IAAF officials contend.

Gay, who won the 100- and 200-meter titles at U.S. nationals last month, said he would pull out of next month’s world championships in Moscow.

Adidas has suspended its sponsorship of Gay, 30.

In a statement, Adidas officials said, “We are shocked by these recent allegations, and even if we presume his innocence until proven otherwise, our contract with Tyson is currently suspended.”

Powell, who held the world record in the 100 until countryman Usain Bolt lowered it in 2008, and Olympic gold medalist Sherone Simpson also face suspension after failing tests at the Jamaican championships last month.

Italian police confiscated unidentified substances Monday in a raid on the hotel where Powell and Simpson were staying in Lignano Sabbiadoro.

IAAF spokesman Nick Davies said the sport’s governing body’s fight against doping “is enhanced, not diminished, each time we are able to uncover a new case.”

In a statement, Davies said, “The IAAF’s commitment to anti-doping in athletics is unwavering because we have an ethical obligation to the majority of athletes who believe in clean sport. The fact that we are able to detect and remove from the sport athletes who have breached our anti-doping rules should be seen in this context.”

Auto racing

NASCAR to automate rule book

NASCAR plans to automate its rule book and revamp its appeals process in a wide-ranging effort to bring more clarity to race teams and fans.

Sports business

Real Madrid leads Forbes’ list

Real Madrid of Spain heads Forbes’ 50 most valuable teams in the world, with two more soccer powers — Manchester United of England and Barcelona of Spain — in the next two spots.

Forbes values Real Madrid at $3.3 billion. Baseball’s New York Yankees are fourth on the list at $2.3 billion and the NFL Dallas Cowboys are fifth at $2.1 billion.

Meanwhile, the Seahawks rank 27th on the Forbes list at $1.04 billion.

ELSEWHERE

Kenwyne Jones had a goal and an assist, helping Trinidad and Tobago to a 2-0 victory over 10-man Honduras in a Group B match in Houston to advance to the quarterfinals of the CONCACAF Gold Cup soccer tournament.

Honduras won its first two matches and is headed to the quarterfinals as the Group B winner.

Honduras played a man down starting in the 37th minute, when Jose Velasquez got a red card.

Earlier, El Salvador reached the quarterfinals by defeating Haiti 1-0 in another Group B match.

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