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Originally published August 21, 2014 at 4:22 PM | Page modified August 21, 2014 at 6:33 PM

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Boeing’s Conner takes Ice Bucket challenge

Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Ray Conner has joined the parade of executives and celebrities taking the Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness and donations for ALS, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.


Seattle Times business staff

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Too little, too late Ray. Uhm, the catalyst and challenge was wonderful, in the beginning, but the "challenge" was... MORE
Ice water combined with hot air equal................ MORE
what none of these endless ice-bucket challenge stories tell us is how it relates to als, or how dumping a bucket of... MORE

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Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Ray Conner has joined the parade of executives and celebrities taking the Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness and donations for ALS, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Conner had the icy dousing administered Thursday amid preparations for the Boeing Classic golf tournament at Snoqualmie Ridge. Unlike Bill Gates, who devised a contraption so he could tip the bucket onto himself, Conner recruited a Cathay Pacific Airways executive, James Barrington, to pour the water.

In a video posted on YouTube, Conner says he was invited to take part by EVA Air Chairman K.W. Chang, and he in turn challenged Gary Kelly, chairman and CEO of Southwest Airlines; David Joyce, president and CEO of GE Aviation; and Ray Stephanson, the mayor of Everett.

Conner will be making a donation to the ALS Association as well, a Boeing spokesman said.

Since the challenge started catching on across social media in late July, it has raised more than $41 million for ALS, The New York Times reported.

ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a neuromuscular disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing those with the disease to progressively lose control of their muscle movements. It often leads to paralysis and death within two to five years of diagnosis, according to the ALS Association. There is no known cure.



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