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Originally published April 2, 2014 at 1:42 PM | Page modified April 2, 2014 at 2:00 PM

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College athletes take labor cause to Capitol Hill

Members of a group seeking to unionize college athletes are looking for allies on Capitol Hill as they brace for an appeal of a ruling that said full scholarship athletes at Northwestern University are employees who have the right to form a union.


AP Education Writer

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WASHINGTON —

Members of a group seeking to unionize college athletes are looking for allies on Capitol Hill as they brace for an appeal of a ruling that said full scholarship athletes at Northwestern University are employees who have the right to form a union.

Former Northwestern quarterback Kain Colter -- the face of a movement to give college athletes the right to unionize -- and Ramogi Huma, the founder and president of the National College Players Association, scheduled meetings Wednesday with lawmakers.

Among those they were to meet were Rep. George Miller of California, the top Democrat on the House Education and Labor Committee; Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., whose district includes Northwestern; and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill.

The meetings were expected to provide a chance for the athletes to spell out one of their chief concerns, which is providing for the medical needs of athletes. Huma said the group also was concerned that the NCAA would lobby Congress to prohibit unionizing by college athletes.

"We want to make sure they have an opportunity to hear from us directly," Huma said.

In a statement, Stacey Osburn, director of public and media relations for the NCAA, said Huma's concern was "unwarranted." A Northwestern official has said that the students were not employees and that unionization and collective bargaining were not the appropriate methods to address their concerns.

"The law is fairly clear and consistent with Northwestern's position, so the NCAA has made no contacts with anyone in Congress attempting to ban the unionization of student-athletes," Osburn said.

Last week's ruling by a regional National Labor Relations Board director in Chicago said Northwestern football players on full scholarships are employees of the university and have the right to form a union and bargain collectively.

While the athletes' effort has generated some support among Democrats, Education Secretary Arne Duncan and the White House have declined to comment on the ruling. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Rep. John Kline, R-Minn. -- two lawmakers influential on education and labor issues -- came out against it.

The university has said it would file a request for the full board in Washington to review the decision. It has until April 9 to do so.

The federal labor agency does not have jurisdiction over public universities, so the push to unionize athletes has been primarily targeted toward private schools such as Northwestern.

Opponents say giving college athletes employee status and allowing them to unionize could hurt college sports and higher education in numerous ways.

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Associated Press writers Tom Raum and Donna Cassata contributed to this report.

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Follow Kimberly Hefling on Twitter: http://twitter.com/khefling



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