Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published March 6, 2014 at 12:40 PM | Page modified March 7, 2014 at 1:42 AM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (0)
  • Print

Judge rules for Samsung in dispute with Apple

A federal judge in California on Thursday denied Apple's request to permanently ban Samsung from selling 23 older-model smartphones and tablets that a jury found infringed on patents held by the maker of iPhones and iPads.


Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
No comments have been posted to this article.
Start the conversation >

advertising

SAN JOSE, Calif. —

A federal judge in California on Thursday denied Apple's request to permanently ban Samsung from selling 23 older-model smartphones and tablets that a jury found infringed on patents held by the maker of iPhones and iPads.

Judge Lucy Koh said Apple Inc. failed to prove that the South Korean company's patent infringement caused irreparable harm to Apple sales.

The ruling came as the world's two biggest smartphone makers prepare to go to court again later this month -- this time over Apple's allegations that Samsung's newest devices, such as its Galaxy S III, also copied Apple technology.

The ruling Thursday stemmed from a 2012 verdict in which a jury agreed with Apple that Samsung had infringed touchscreen features.

However, Koh on Thursday denied Apple's request for a permanent injunction to stop Samsung from selling the products, saying she was not convinced those features drove consumer demand.

Apple has argued in courts, government tribunals and regulatory agencies around the world that Samsung's Android-based phones copy vital iPhone features. Samsung has fought back with its own complaints that some key Apple patents are invalid and that Apple has copied Samsung's technology.

In November, a Silicon Valley jury added $290 million to damages awarded to Apple in connection with the 2012 jury verdict, bringing to $930 million the total amount owed by Samsung.



Want unlimited access to seattletimes.com? Subscribe now!

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

The summer is wide open.

The summer is wide open.

Follow our three-part "Washington's National Parks" series running through August 10 for an in-depth look at some of our local treasures.

Advertising

Advertising


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►