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Originally published Wednesday, February 19, 2014 at 6:37 PM

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FCC will rewrite rules to ensure open access to the Internet

The FCC won’t take the controversial step of formally designating high-speed Internet service for the type of tougher regulation faced by phone companies — a move many consumer groups have advocated.


Los Angeles Times

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“The Internet was free and open before the FCC adopted Net neutrality rules... MORE
Soon will come the day when they'll only be one or two ISP's, and they will 100% decide... MORE
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WASHINGTON — The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) won’t appeal a court decision tossing out its Internet neutrality rules and will try again to craft regulations to ensure open access to the Internet that would stand up to expected legal challenges, agency Chairman Tom Wheeler said Wednesday.

The FCC won’t take the controversial step of formally designating high-speed Internet service for the type of tougher regulation faced by phone companies — a move many consumer groups have advocated — but Wheeler said he will keep that option open “to utilize if warranted.”

“The Internet is and must remain the greatest engine of free expression, innovation, economic growth and opportunity the world has ever known,” Wheeler said. “We must preserve and promote the Internet.”

Last month’s court decision provided the FCC with guidance about how it could rewrite the rules so they won’t get tossed out again, Wheeler said.

But this will be the third time the agency has tried to come up with regulations to prevent Internet service providers from blocking or discriminating against some Web content, such as Netflix, that competes with the providers’ own services.

Twice before, federal judges have struck down the FCC’s approach after challenges from Internet providers. The most recent challenge was by Verizon Communications.

“The Internet was free and open before the FCC adopted Net neutrality rules. It remains free and open today,” said FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai, one of two Republicans on the Democrat-controlled panel.

Republicans have opposed the FCC’s attempts to enact such rules, arguing that the Internet has thrived because it has been free from government regulation.

But Democrats, including President Obama and his newly appointed FCC chief, Wheeler, strongly support Net neutrality.

Last month, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit tossed out the FCC’s so-called open-Internet rules. The court said the agency did not have the authority to enforce the rules on providers because it did not classify broadband service as a telecommunications service.

Putting broadband service into the same category as the more regulated phone service would resolve that problem, but Internet providers and Republicans in Congress oppose such a move.

Wheeler is to propose new rules in late spring or early summer that will try to fulfill key components of Net neutrality without reclassifying broadband service.

One goal is to ensure that Internet service providers don’t block consumers from accessing “any lawful content and services they choose,” Wheeler said.

Another goal is to ensure that Internet service providers don’t discriminate against different types of content, particularly by favoring their own services, such as movie streaming, over those of competitors.

The agency will try to revise those rules so they are similar to earlier data-roaming rules that withstood legal challenge. The FCC also will try to guarantee an open Internet by enforcing its rules requiring network operators to disclose how they manage Internet traffic.

Wheeler said the FCC also would hold Internet service providers to their commitments to honor the goals of the Net neutrality rules while new ones are drafted.



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