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Originally published February 17, 2014 at 3:34 PM | Page modified February 18, 2014 at 6:04 PM

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Trade ban on lacy underwear doesn’t sit well in Russia

The ban will outlaw any underwear containing less than 6 percent cotton from being imported, made or sold in Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan.


The Associated Press

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Our state is going to have to try really hard to top this nanny state regulation. MORE
How do they plan to enforce this? "Off with your pants!" or dress or skirt :) MORE
Maybe our Congress isn't so bad... they are inept and uncapable of making progress but... MORE

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MOSCOW — A trade ban on lacy lingerie has Russian consumers and their neighbors with their knickers in a twist.

The ban will outlaw any underwear containing less than 6 percent cotton from being imported, made, or sold in Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan.

And it has struck a chord in places where La Perla and Victoria’s Secret are panty paradises compared with Soviet-era cotton underwear, which was often about as flattering and shapely as drapery.

On Sunday, 30 female protesters in Kazakhstan were arrested and thrown into police vans while wearing lace underwear on their heads and shouting “Freedom to panties!”

The ban in those three countries was first outlined in 2010 by the Eurasian Economic Commission, which regulates the customs union, and it won’t go into effect until July 1. But a consumer outcry against it already is reaching a fever pitch.

Photographs comparing sexy modern underwear to outdated, Soviet goods began spreading on Facebook and Twitter on Sunday, as women and men alike railed against the prospective changes.

“As a rule, lacy underwear ... is literally snatched off the shelves,” said Alisa Sapardiyeva, the manager of a lingerie store in Moscow, DD-Shop, as she flicked through her colorful wares. “If you take that away again, the buyer is going to be the one who suffers the most.”

According to the Russian Textile Businesses Union, more than $4 billion worth of underwear is sold in Russia annually, and 80 percent of it is foreign made. Analysts have estimated that 90 percent of products would disappear from shelves, if the ban goes into effect this summer.

The Eurasian Economic Commission declined to comment Monday, saying it was preparing a statement about the underwear ban.

While consumer outrage may force customs officials to compromise, many see the underwear ban as yet another example of the misguided economic policies that have become a trademark of many post-Soviet countries.

Sunday’s panty protest in Kazakhstan followed a larger demonstration Saturday against a 19 percent devaluation of the country’s currency, the tenge.

Other people laughed off the panty ban, seeing it as yet another attempt to add regulations and controls to an already byzantine bureaucracy in the three countries.

“I think (the girls) ... will still have the opportunity to wear it (synthetic underwear) whether you can buy it in Russia or not,” said Muscovite Trifon Gadzhikasimov, 22, noting that most of his friends travel abroad regularly. “I think this is just another silly law that shows the ineffectiveness of our government.”



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