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Originally published August 19, 2013 at 8:07 PM | Page modified August 20, 2013 at 6:39 PM

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California city a newsmaker as rare, 2-newspaper town

Bold owners of The Orange County Register have launched a new daily newspaper in neighboring Long Beach, Calif., defying the old-media trend of shrinking print circulations and online news migration.

The Associated Press

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LONG BEACH, Calif. — The latest experiment in American journalism is a throwback: a new daily newspaper to compete against an established one in a big city.

The front page of Monday’s debut edition of the Long Beach Register featured stories under the headlines “Welcome to your new local paper” and “A glimpse into Long Beach’s future.”

With the newspaper, the ambitious owners of The Orange County Register are expanding their bet that consumers will reward an investment in news inked on paper and delivered to their doorsteps — that their newspaper will be a big part of Long Beach’s future.

The competition is the Long Beach Press-Telegram, founded more than a century ago.

As a result of the budding newspaper battle, this city of 468,000 is joining the likes of Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston as what has become a rarity in 21st-century America — the two-newspaper town. Never mind shrinking circulations and online news migration.

“We believe that a city with the size and vibrancy of Long Beach should be happy to support a great newspaper of the variety we want to provide,” said Aaron Kushner, who since buying The Orange County Register a year ago with a partner has surprised industry watchers by expanding reporting staff and page counts.

“If it is, we’ll make healthy money. If it’s not, that’ll be unfortunate for everyone. But we believe we’ll be successful,” Kushner said.

By launching the Long Beach Register, Kushner, publisher of the Register and CEO of Freedom Communications, is taking his contrarian instincts outside Orange County.

Media business analyst Rick Edmonds said the last time he can recall a major U.S. city adding a new daily paper was around World War II, when Chicago got the Sun-Times and New York got Newsday.

There have been other scattered instances in smaller cities, but since newspapers entered their recent troubles, the creation of a new rivalry is itself news. A brewing newspaper war in New Orleans between that city’s Times-Picayune and a challenger based about 80 miles away in Baton Rouge, La., is the closest to what’s unfolding in Long Beach.

“How will it play out?” asked Edmonds, of the Poynter Institute, a journalism foundation in St. Petersburg, Fla. “Don’t really know until it happens.”

Long Beach is a diverse city better known for its sprawling containership port — one of the world’s largest — than for its beaches.

While its oceanfront drive features a large aquarium and the historic Queen Mary ocean liner, it also has big-city problems, including gangs. Bordering Orange County’s urbanized north, it is in Los Angeles County, about 20 miles south of downtown L.A.

In their small, sunlight-flooded newsroom, reporters for the new Register were greeted Thursday with two boxes of doughnuts and the kinds of issues that bedevil startups: who sits where, how come this outlet has no power, and how to get an Internet connection.

After a round of introductions, editor Paul Eakins told his staff that with at least 16 pages to fill each day, the paper would both cover “hyperlocal” news and welcome contributions from readers. In all, the paper has about 20 editorial employees.

Write about a boy becoming an Eagle Scout? Yes. Opening of the new dog park? You bet.

“I don’t think they quite know what’s coming,” Eakins said of readers.

Publisher Ian Lamont said 10,000 copies were being distributed Monday. The paper will be wrapped around The Orange County Register, so readers will get coverage of Long Beach’s schools, sports, courts, happenings and City Hall — plus regional and world news. No separate Long Beach paper will be put out on weekends.

By contrast, the Press-Telegram maintains an average weekday circulation of about 55,000.

Several Long Beach Register reporters are Press-Telegram alums, and though Eakins downplayed any rivalry, at the staff meeting there were gentle jabs about besting an old employer.

For their part, the Press-Telegram’s bosses are giving no ground.

“We’re not going to let a competitor come into our city and take it,” said Michael Anastasi, vice president of news and executive editor of the Los Angeles News Group, which owns the Press-Telegram and eight other daily papers in the area.

The competition’s certain winners, Anastasi said, will be local residents.

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