Skip to main content
Advertising

Originally published Friday, April 5, 2013 at 12:24 AM

  • Share:
           
  • Comments (0)
  • Print

Indian government lifts curbs on sales of sugar

The government has decided to lift curbs on India's $15.5 billion sugar industry that restricted sales of sugar on the open market and required mills to sell sugar to the government at a deep discount.

The Associated Press

Most Popular Comments
Hide / Show comments
No comments have been posted to this article.
Start the conversation >

advertising

NEW DELHI —

The government has decided to lift curbs on India's $15.5 billion sugar industry that restricted sales of sugar on the open market and required mills to sell sugar to the government at a deep discount.

Food Minister K.V. Thomas said the Cabinet decided late Thursday that sugar mills will no longer face quotas on the amount of sugar they can sell or be forced to sell 10 percent of their output at a discount to the government's public distribution network at a loss to the industry of 30 billion rupees annually.

With the lifting of curbs, the sugar industry would immediately reap this benefit.

The government will now purchase sugar on the open market and sell it at a cheaper rate through the public network intended for the poor.

The government's bill for subsidizing the purchase of sugar would double from the current 26 billion rupees ($474 million) to 53 billion rupees, Thomas said.

India is the world's second-largest producer of sugar and as well as the world's biggest consumer of the sweetener.

Thomas said that sugar prices would not rise as a result of the government's action.

The sugar industry was the only industry that had remained under government control in a throwback to an earlier era when most sectors of the Indian economy were controlled.

"By arriving at the decision in the Cabinet, we've kept the interest of all stakeholders - farmers, consumers and the industry - in mind," Thomas said.

Freeing up sugar sales will prevent sharp swings in demand and imports that have led to volatility in global sugar prices.

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

The Seattle Times Historical Archives

Browse our newspaper page archives from 1900-1984


Advertising
The Seattle Times

The door is closed, but it's not locked.

Take a minute to subscribe and continue to enjoy The Seattle Times for as little as 99 cents a week.

Subscription options ►

Already a subscriber?

We've got good news for you. Unlimited seattletimes.com content access is included with most subscriptions.

Subscriber login ►