Advertising

The Seattle Times Company

NWjobs | NWautos | NWhomes | NWsource | Free Classifieds | seattletimes.com

Business / Technology


Our network sites seattletimes.com | Advanced

Originally published Sunday, April 24, 2011 at 10:00 PM

Comments (0)     E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

Roomba-maker iRobot clears path for robotics

The success is new for a company that teetered on the edge of survival for its first decade and a half. Founded in 1990 by Angle, MIT professor Rodney Brooks and graduate student Helen Greiner, the company's mission was initially vague: to make practical robots that could be useful in everyday lives.

Los Angeles Times

quotes Yeah, vacuuming sucks. Read more
quotes Packbots were sent into the reactors at Fukushima to have a look-see. There is enough... Read more
quotes Roomba. is a failure We bought one in 2003 and had more problems with it than I care to... Read more

advertising

BEDFORD, Mass. — Top scientists around the world are trying to improve upon robots, which can already detect bombs, perform surgery and even go into battle.

At iRobot Corp., they're trying to make a better vacuum.

Of course, iRobot's scientists do other things too. The company, best known for its Roomba floor vacuum, recently sent machines to Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear-plant disaster to help detect radiation.

But home robots — dominated by vacuums — make up 55 percent of the company's revenue and are part of the reason iRobot is on a tear. Shares are up 43 percent since the start of the year, and the company earned a profit of $26 million on sales of $401 million last year, up from $3 million on $299 million in revenue the year before.

Last week, the company announced it had won a contract to make bomb-disposal robots for the Navy.

That iRobot, the only public company that focuses purely on robotics, is getting attention from investors indicates that this young industry is becoming more mainstream. As analysts and consumers get more comfortable with robots, more companies might succeed in the space.

"It's almost like buying Internet companies in the 1990s," said Alex Hamilton, an analyst with Early Bird Capital who covers iRobot. "The sky's the limit."

Not everyone is a fan. A 2008 Consumer Reports review of vacuums found that the Roomba 560 "was among the worst performers at cleaning edges and corners." On consumer tech site CNET, comments ranged from "always broken, warranty poor" to "It's awesome! Great for what it costs."

The company is now trying to boost sales of secondary items, such as pool and gutter cleaners, to go along with its best-selling Roomba and Scooba robots.

Next up: a device on wheels that can follow you around the house like Rosie from "The Jetsons" and someday maybe even bring you a beer. The company predicts an expanding market in robots that assist the country's aging population.

"No one has ever made money with robots before," said chief executive Colin Angle, a freckle-faced 43-year-old "But ours create more value than they cost to build."

The growth is evident at the company's headquarters in a Bedford, Mass., office park, where young men in ties and white shirts follow a tour on their first day of orientation. Awards from the last decade sit along the walls: gold-plated and silver Roombas, a crystal Entrepreneur of the Year award for Angle. IRobot now employs about 650 people.

The success is new for a company that teetered on the edge of survival for its first decade and a half. Founded in 1990 by Angle, MIT professor Rodney Brooks and graduate student Helen Greiner, the company's mission was initially vague: to make practical robots that could be useful in everyday lives.

At the time, few investors believed this was a profitable venture, so the three put company expenses on their credit cards, and struggled.

IRobot didn't receive its first venture funding until 1998. Even then, its endeavors were disjointed, spread across eight divisions: robots that could vacuum floors, entertain children and work on oil wells, to name just a few. It sent robots to work in war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan, but the government contracts weren't profitable enough to support the flailing consumer side.

The company nearly went under in 2002 as it tried to find retailers that would stock the newly completed Roomba. Just when its founders had given up hope, the Brookstone retailing chain called, saying that a test run of the machines had gone well and that consumer demand was increasing.

Comments (0)     E-mail E-mail article      Print Print      Share Share

News where, when and how you want it

Email Icon

Video

Advertising

NDN Video

Marketplace

New 3-wheelers merge fun and safety new
Children who begin their vehicular life on tricycles typically migrate to two-wheelers by the time they start kindergarten, eventually graduating to f...
Post a comment

Advertising