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Originally published Tuesday, August 12, 2014 at 6:15 AM

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Brain rules for baby, a cartoon introduction to climate change

New books with Seattle connections include an updated “Brain Rules for Baby” by John Medina, an entertaining look at climate change by Yoram Bauman and the story of Chuck Bundrant, founder of Trident Seafoods.


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New releases

“Brain Rules for Baby” by John Medina (Pear Press, $15.95). Medina, a University of Washington developmental molecular biologist updates his best-selling book that uses science to illustrate how a child’s brain develops and ways to help it do so.

“The Cartoon Introduction to Climate Change” by Yoram Bauman and Grady Klein (Island Press, $19.95). Seattle author Bauman, who calls himself “the world’s first and only stand-up economist,” tackles the heated topic of global warming with a light touch. Klein is the cartoonist; Bauman graduated from the University of Washington (where he also taught) and Lakeside High School.

“Catching a Deckload of Dreams” by John van Amerongen (Documentary Media, $39.95). The author chronicles the journey of Chuck Bundrant, chairman and founder of Seattle-based Trident Seafoods Corporation, the largest vertically integrated seafood harvesting and processing company in North America. Van Amerongen has been a cook and deckhand aboard a purse seiner and also a longtime journalist. He lives in Ballard.

“John Mullan: The Tumultuous Life of a Western Road Builder” by Keith C. Petersen (WSU Press, $32.95). Petersen, Idaho state historian, takes a fresh look at the engineer whose work significantly impacted the development of the Northwest. Mullan developed a 625-mile stretch of road that connected the Missouri and Columbia rivers and became a critical link of Interstate 90. Petersen lives in Pullman.



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