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Originally published February 18, 2014 at 3:03 AM | Page modified February 18, 2014 at 1:08 PM

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The story behind the monorail effort

New in local books: the attempt to build the monorail, the growth of the local Ethiopian community, the limitations of organized labor and the story of a stuffed elephant.


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Pity the money issue was screwed up. The darn thing should have been built instead of... MORE
They had little money compared to the 60 million spent a day on the "lite"... MORE
The monorail opponents that were pushing light rail managed to do something that hadn't... MORE

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New releases

“Rise Above It All” by Dick Falkenbury (Falkenbury Enterprises, $14.36). The Seattle resident writes about his effort to establish a 40-mile monorail system. He describes it as a cautionary tale about “a city that once led the way.”

“Little Ethiopia of the Pacific Northwest” by Joseph W. Scott and Solomon A. Getahun (Transaction, $39.95). The story of Seattle’s Ethiopian community, which began with about 24 students who came here during the Ethiopian revolution of 1974 and now numbers at around 10,000. Scott is a professor emeritus of sociology from the UW.

“What Unions No Longer Do” by Jake Rosenfeld (Harvard University Press, $39.95). Rosenfeld, an associate professor of sociology at the UW, addresses the “broad consequences of organized labor’s diminishment” in the United States.

“My Blue Bunny Bubbit” by Maggie Smith (Clarion, $16.99). For ages 4-6: A young girl and her grandma sew a stuffed elephant for a new baby brother, so he will have a special toy just like the girl’s homemade bunny. The author/illustrator lives in Seattle.



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