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Tuesday, September 6, 2011 - Page updated at 02:36 p.m.

Rewind | 9/11: Balancing security and freedom

Join us on Tuesday, Sept. 6 from noon to 1 p.m. to discuss the progress the U.S. has made in ensuring America's security while balancing civil rights. Seattle Times Opinion columnist Lance Dickie will moderate. Submit questions in advance of the chat.

Chat participants

Arsalan Bukhari, executive director, CAIR-Washington

Motivated by the growing prejudice against Muslims, Bukhari started as a volunteer with CAIR-WA with a resolve to establish a center for professional Muslim activism in Washington state and helped launch a new era for CAIR's Seattle office. An alumnus of the Seattle Police Department's Citizen's Academy, he leads local efforts to foster positive relations with law enforcement officials, elected officials, political appointees, and representatives of various government agencies.

Slade Gorton, former member of the 9/11 Commission

Slade Gorton was a member of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, commonly referred to as the 9/11 Commission. He represented Washington state in the U.S. Senate for 18 years and is now at K&L Gates LLP, an international law firm.

Paul Lawrence, former president, American Civil Liberties Union of Washington

With more than 27 years in appellate and trial litigation in federal and state courts, Paul has prevailed in numerous appeals principally in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and the Washington Supreme Court. His practice focuses on municipal, constitutional, environmental, insurance and commercial law. He serves on the Board of Directors of the ACLU-WA.

John McKay, former U.S. Attorney and law professor

John joined the faculty of Seattle University School of Law in January 2007. He teaches Constitutional Law of Terrorism and National Security Law, as well as courses on ethics and leadership. He was nominated by George W. Bush to serve as the U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington on Sept. 19, 2001, The U.S. Senate confirmed his nomination on Oct. 24, 2001. He began his tenure on Oct. 30, 2001, and resigned along with eight other U.S. Attorneys in January 2007.