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COURTESY OF ADELINE SMITH

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The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe's journey of discovery, both painful and healing

White settlers commonly believed that they were witnessing the last of the Indians, who would soon die out, a vanquished race. But the Klallams adapted and survived. Lower Elwha Klallam elder Adeline Smith's grandfather, Joe Sampson, standing, found a way to support himself in the new, money economy by running a ferry in the mid-1920s across the Elwha River for 25 cents per crossing. The ferry was hand-pulled across by cable.